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Abstract: TH-PO384

The Burden of Psychiatric Disorders in Polycystic Kidney Disease

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1101 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Imasuen, Uyi Jefferson, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Dangelser, Brady Marcus, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Jandal, Ali D., University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Bhutani, Gauri, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
Background

Epidemiology of psychiatric illness in Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is not well known.

Methods

We performed a retrospective cohort study using EMR data at our institution to determine the frequency of select psychiatric disorders in patients with “PKD” and chronic kidney disease from other causes (“non-PKD/CKD”) seen at our Nephrology clinic between 1/1/2000 – 4/30/2020. Psychiatric disorders and the two cohorts were identified using ICD-9/10 codes. Patients with unclear diagnostic codes and diabetes were excluded. The date of the first visit to Nephrology clinic was regarded as “Index date”. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders at the index date as well as incidence of these disorders after the index date were compared between “PKD” and “non-PKD/CKD” cohorts.

Results

A total of 661 PKD patients and 5,204 non-PKD/CKD patients were seen at our center over the study duration. Patients in PKD cohort were younger at presentation (Index date; mean 53 years vs 61 years in non-PKD/CKD; p<0.01) and more often male (57% [376] vs 52% [2636]; p=0.03). Majority of patients in both groups identified as white (90% [594] vs 87% [4392]). At the Index date, PKD patients were more often employed (37% [244] vs 28% [1380], p<0.01), married (58% [378] vs 56% [2748], p=0.048), had higher eGFR (median [IQR] 55 [31-84] vs 45 [29-61] mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.01) and lower Charlson comorbidity index (2 [0-4] vs 4 [3-6], p<0.01). Follow-up was shorter in the PKD cohort pre-index date (18 [0-82] vs 35 [0-99] months; p<0.01) but longer post-index date (84 [45-132] vs 52 [20-97]; p<0.01). Apart from depression, both the prevalence and incidence of other psychiatric disorders (bipolar, anxiety, schizophrenia, ADHD) were similar between the two groups. The multivariable models adjust for age, sex, race, Charlson score and appropriate follow up time. [table]

Conclusion

Despite lower burden of comorbid illness and better socio-economic factors, the burden of psychiatric disorders in PKD patients is considerable and similar in frequency to non-PKD/CKD.

Prevalence and Incidence of Psychiatric Disorders
 Prevalence, % (N)Adjusted Odds ratio (PKD vs CKD)Incidence, rate per 1000 person yearsAdjusted hazard ratio (PKD vs CKD)
PKD N=661CKD N=5024Ratio (95% CI)P-valuePKD N=661CKD
N=5024
Ratio (95% CI)P-value
Depression15 (98)22 (1104)0.78 (0.6-0.98)0.0423.123.51.09 (0.89-1.34)0.41
Bipolar3.6 (24)3 (150)1.21 (0.76-1.9)0.421.21.90.87 (0.55-1.39)0.57
Anxiety18 (116)21 (1041)1.04 (0.83-1.31)0.7226.429.30.94 (0.5-1.78)0.85
Schizophrenia2.9 (19)3.4 (171)1.13 (0.69-1.85)0.624.16.940.6 (0.25-1.45)0.26
ADHD1.4 (9)1.7 (87)0.7 (0.34-1.43)0.332.342.341.02 (0.85-1.24)0.77