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Abstract: SA-PO759

Tissue Sodium Content and Intramuscular Adipose Tissue Accumulation in Individuals With Early Hypertension

Session Information

  • Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms
    November 05, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1503 Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms

Authors

  • Ertuglu, Lale A., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Sahinoz, Melis, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Akwo, Elvis Abang, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Guide, Andrew, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Stewart, Thomas G., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Pike, Mindy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Madhur, Meena S., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Harrison, David G., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Ikizler, Talat Alp, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
Background

High tissue sodium (Na+) accumulation has been associated with the development of hypertension through activation of inflammatory pathways. Hypertension is also linked with increased adiposity. Whether tissue Na+ plays a role in this relationship remains unknown. We hypothesized that excess tissue Na+ in the muscle could lead to intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) deposition and that pro-inflammatory characteristics of tissue Na+ mediate this effect in individuals with early hypertension.

Methods

IMAT and Na+ accumulation in the skin and muscle were measured using 1H- and 23Na- MRI imaging of the calf in 83 subjects with early hypertension (systolic blood pressure between 120 and 139 mmHg, or a diastolic blood pressure 70 and 89 mmHg). Blood samples were collected for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measurements.

Results

Median age was 48, with 68% female and BMI 27.5 kg/m2. Median muscle and skin Na+ were 16.6 (IQR: 14.9-19) and 12.6 (IQR: 10.9-16.6) mmol/L, respectively. Median IMAT was 1.3 mL. IMAT was positively correlated with muscle and skin Na+ (r=0.38, p<0.001 and r=0.48, p<0.001, respectively). There was a significant effect modification of the relationship between IMAT and skin Na+ by the inflammatory markers in models adjusted for age and sex. The effect of skin Na+ on IMAT volume increased at high levels of inflammatory markers (p= 0.03 and 0.01 for hsCRP and IL-6, respectively).

Conclusion

Our data show that high tissue Na+ concentrations in both skin and muscle associate with increased IMAT, suggesting an adipogenic effect. Systemic inflammation may play a key role in the relationship between skin Na+ and IMAT, potentially through high sodium-induced systemic inflammatory activation in the skin.

The interaction between hsCRP and muscle sodium for the association with IMAT.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support