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Abstract: TH-PO680

Iron Deficiency Impairs Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function and Exercise Performance in CKD

Session Information

  • Anemia and Iron Metabolism
    November 03, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Anemia and Iron Metabolism

  • 200 Anemia and Iron Metabolism

Authors

  • Oliveira, Benjamin A., King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Mangahis, Emmanuel, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Reid, Fiona, King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Burton, James, University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Mccafferty, Kieran, The Royal London Hospital, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Wilkinson, Thomas James, University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Asgari, Elham, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Beckley-Hoelscher, Nick, King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Banerjee, Debasish, St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Watson, Emma L., University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Swift, Pauline A., Epsom and Saint Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust, Carshalton, Sutton, United Kingdom
  • Lightfoot, Courtney Jane, University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Baker, Luke A., University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Reid, Chante, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Wheeler, David C., University College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Smith, Alice C., University of Leicester, Leicester, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Greenwood, Sharlene A., King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Bramham, Kate, King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Ayis, Salma, King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Kalra, Philip A., Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, Salford, United Kingdom
  • Bhandari, Sunil, Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom
  • Macdougall, Iain C., King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Okonko, Darlington, King's College London, London, London, United Kingdom
Background

Skeletal muscle (SM) mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is impaired in patients with CKD and could be worsened by iron deficiency (ID).

Methods

We quantified SM OXPHOS and exercise capacity in CKD pts with a Hb > 110 g/dL (n=38, Table 1), and in healthy volunteers (n=6). SM OXPHOS was measured using high resolution respirometry (HRR) of quadriceps biopsies and using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS).

Results

On HRR, carbohydrate (Fig A) but not fatty-acid (Fig B) driven maximal coupled OXPHOS capacity was lowest in pts with ID, but was a higher % of maximal uncoupled ETC capacity in these pts (Fig C) implying that mitochondria were operating at their maxima. Pts with ID also had longer phosphocreatinine recovery halftime on 31P-MRS (33 vs. 25 vs. 17 s, P<0.01) and lower exercise capacity (Fig D, E). Adjustment for Hb did not alter results.

Conclusion

ID intrinsically correlates with worse SM OXPHOS in CKD.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support