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Abstract: SA-PO758

High Tissue Sodium Associates With Insulin Resistance in Prehypertensive Obese Individuals

Session Information

  • Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms
    November 05, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1503 Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms

Authors

  • Ertuglu, Lale A., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Sahinoz, Melis, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Akwo, Elvis Abang, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Guide, Andrew, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Stewart, Thomas G., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Pike, Mindy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Madhur, Meena S., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Harrison, David G., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Ikizler, Talat Alp, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
Background

High tissue sodium (Na+) accumulation plays a role in the development of hypertension by activation of inflammatory and metabolic pathways. We sought to determine if tissue Na+ content is associated with insulin sensitivity (IS) in patients with early hypertension, a known metabolic derangement commonly observed in patients with kidney and cardiovascular disease.

Methods

Tissue Na+ accumulation and IS were assessed in 83 participants with early hypertension (SBP 120 - 139 mmHg or DBP 70 - 89 mmHg) using 23NaMRI and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. Glucose disposal rate (GDR) was used as the marker of IS. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were used as markers of inflammation.

Results

GDR did not significantly associate with tissue Na+ in the entire cohort. In subgroup analysis according to obese vs lean, GDR significantly associated with muscle and skin Na+ among the obese (β=-1.11, 95% CI = -1.99, -0.24 and β=-0.45, 95% CI = -0.83, -0.07 for muscle and skin Na+, respectively) but not in lean participants. Among obese participants, there was significant effect modification by the inflammatory markers. The changes in GDR per unit changes in tissue Na+ were greater at higher levels of hsCRP (p=0.03 and 0.01 for muscle and skin Na+, respectively) and IL-6 (p=0.05 and 0.01 for muscle and skin Na+, respectively). This was not observed in lean participants.

Conclusion

Our data show a significant negative association between muscle and skin Na+ and IS in the obese, but not in lean individuals with early hypertension. Systemic inflammation may play a key role in the relationship between tissue Na+ and IS.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support