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Abstract: SA-PO278

Improving Daily Physical Activity in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis Using Plantar Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Randomized Double-Blinded Controlled Trial

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • Lee, Myeounggon, Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Hamad, Abdullah Ibrahim, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Ibrahim, Rania Abdelaziz, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Ateya, Heba Mohamed, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Mathew, Mincy, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Momin, Anmol S., Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Najafi, Bijan, Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Al-Ali, Fadwa S., Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
Background

Physical inactivity among patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) is a persistent clinical problem. Intradialytic electrical stimulation (E-stim) can be a practical solution as it can be used by patients during lying down or sitting, and does not require any effort in the patients. Especially, E-stim to the plantar region of the feet can have the benefit of activating lower limb muscles and enhance the sensitivity for the somatosensory signal from the foot, which may improve the stability and increase the physical activities in HD patients.

Methods

Participants were randomized into either an intervention group (IG: n=24, age=55.8 ± 13.4 years, BMI = 30.2 ± 5.9 kg/m2, female = 28.0%) receiving PENS or a control group (CG: n=25, age = 57.28 ± 12.2 years, BMI = 30.8 ± 5.9 kg/m2, female = 40.0%). The IG received 1-hour PENS during the routine HD (3 sessions/week) for 12 weeks. The CG received an identical but non-functional device for the same period.

Results

All participants in the IG tolerated the PENS and completed all therapy sessions, indicating the feasibility of incorporating PENS during clinic visit. As an IG, there was a significant increase in standing duration between baseline and 12-weeks (d = 0.91, p = 0.036); and there were also increase trends, but not significant, in walking duration (d = 0.79, p = 0.071) and daily step count (d = 0.82, p = 0.063) in those periods (Figure 1). As a CG, there was no significance in those periods.

Conclusion

Findings suggest PENS during the routine HD process may improve mobility in daily life of HD patients. We recommend this practical therapy as an alternative way for the patients who can not do regular exercise if the results will be held with a larger sample.

Figure (A) Participants in the intervention group (IG) showed significant improvement

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.