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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO070

Seeing Is Believing: Imaging Tests in Acute Renal Failure and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Influence on Outcomes

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 102 AKI: Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Acosta-Ochoa, Maria Isabel, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Castilla y León, Spain
  • Coca, Armando, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Castilla y León, Spain
  • Lorenzo, Arturo, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Castilla y León, Spain
  • Mendiluce, Alicia, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Castilla y León, Spain
Background

Imaging techniques allow the diagnosis of abnormalities of renal structure; patients with structural abnormalities have CKD if persist >3 months. We evaluated if an abnormal imaging test influenced outcomes in patients with acute renal failure (ARF) or Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease (AoCKD).

Methods

Retrospective study of in-patients with AKI. We excluded individuals without image tests. We divided the cohort in normal and abnormal imaging, and in acute renal failure (ARF basal GFR >60) and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease (AoCKD basal GFR <59). We compared clinical features, and tested the incidence of need for HD and in-hospital mortality.

Results

We included 616 individuals. Patients with AoCKD in both groups were older and had higher Charlson`s Index (ChI); they were hospitalized less frequently in ICU, and more frequently in medical wards compared to ARF individuals. Besides comorbidities, AKI severity and hard renal and clinical outcomes showed no statistically significant differences between groups; except for higher hospital stay in the AoCKD group with normal imaging tests.

Conclusion

We found that an abnormal imaging test does not confer worse prognosis in ARF neither AoCKD. It is noteworthy that 52% of patients didn’t have an image test during hospitalization. Although individuals with AoCKD are older and have higher ChI, the hard outcomes rates were not affected by an abnormal imaging test. Future studies with more accurate techniques that measure and evaluate kidney volume, in combination with functional imaging and/or elastography could shed light over ARF and AoCKD diagnosis and prognosis.