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Abstract: TH-PO381

Good Nutritional Status Is Associated With Preserved Kidney Function in Ambulatory Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1101 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Lee, Jinwoo, Seoul National University College of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yong Chul, Seoul National University College of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Hayne C., Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Gangwon, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ahn, Curie, National Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Kyu-Beck, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yeong Hoon, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yaerim, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seungyeup, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Bae, Eun Hui, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Oh, Kook-Hwan, Seoul National University College of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Oh, Yun Kyu, Seoul National University College of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Malnutrition is one of common complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We examined whether nutritional status is associated with preservation of kidney function using a cohort of ambulatory ADPKD patients after stratification by subjective global assessment (SGA) score and propensity scores-based matching.

Methods

A total of 805 patients were prospectively enrolled in 11 tertiary medical centers of Korea from May 2019 to December 2021. Among those of 805 patients, 721 patients were included for descriptive analysis and 273 patients with 1-year follow-up data on kidney function and urine proteinuria were finally analyzed to evaluate the effect of nutritional status on kidney function. Subjective global assessment (SGA) was used to assess the nutritional status of patients with ADPKD. The primary outcome was eGFR decline >3 after 1 year follow-up according to nutritional status assessed by SGA (SGA 7 vs. SGA 3-6). Logistic regression model were used to calculate odds ratio (OR) for the primary outcome. Because several baselines differed between two groups, we matched propensity scores with nearest neighbor method.

Results

The mean patient age was 46.3 ± 13.9 years, and 51.0% of the patients were female. The mean eGFR was about 75 ml/min/1.73m<span style="font-size:10.8333px">2</span> and CKD stage 1 was the most common with about 42%. Among 273 patients with available 1-year follow-up data, 107 patients (39.2%) had a eGFR decline >3. The incidence of 1-year eGFR decline >3 was 391.9 per 1,000 person-year. When multivariable logistic regression model was conducted, SGA 3-6 (malnourished status) was identified as significant factors related with 1-year eGFR decline >3 (adjusted OR = 1.18 [1.01–1.37]; P < 0.001). Despite matching propensity scores, the preserved kidney function rate in SGA 7 group (well-nourished status) were still higher than in SGA 3-6 group.

Conclusion

Good nutritional status is associated with preserved kidney funct2ion in ambulatory ADPKD patients. Future randomized clinical trials should determine the causality between them, and the present results will be a basis for these.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.