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Abstract: SA-PO789

Association of Maternal Hypertension With Offspring Kidney Function in a Non-Human Primate Model of Spontaneous Hypertension

Session Information

  • Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms
    November 05, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1503 Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms

Authors

  • Vincent, Carol, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • Chen, Ashton, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • Kavanagh, Kylie, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • South, Andrew M., Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
Background

Early-life exposure to adverse events can program hypertension (HTN) and kidney disease in childhood and early adulthood but the mechanism is not well understood. The spontaneously hypertensive vervet monkey may provide a novel model for investigating early HTN and related renal target organ damage development.

Methods

This is a pilot prospective cross-sectional study of Chlorocebus spp. maternal-offspring dyads. We identified 10 HTN mothers based on prior sedated blood pressure (BP) measurements, defined by the 2017 ACC/AHA Guideline using age ≥13 years old criteria, and randomly selected offspring to complete each dyad. We 1:2 matched each maternal HTN dyad with a maternal normotension dyad by age and offspring sex. Sedated BP, weight, and labs were obtained on dyads. Our exposures were maternal HTN group and maternal BP measurements. Our outcomes were offspring serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Using generalized linear models, we estimated the associations between the exposures and outcomes.

Results

Age range, BP, and sex distribution were similar within the maternal and offspring groups (Table 1). Maternal HTN and BP were not significantly associated with offspring SCr (β 0.08, 95% CL -0.1 to 0.26) or BUN (β 2.6, 95% CL -3.0 to 8.2).

Conclusion

We did not observe an association between maternal HTN and offspring kidney function in maternal-offspring vervet dyads. This could be because offspring of older, less healthy mothers may be too young to show altered kidney function or be due to our small sample size in this pilot study. Next steps include investigating associations of renin-angiotensin system components with offspring BP and organ damage.

Table: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of vervet monkeys

Funding

  • Other NIH Support