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Abstract: SA-PO290

Quantifying Physical Activity Behavior Among Adults Undergoing Hemodialysis Using a Gait Assistive Device: A Prospective Observational Study

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Mishra, Ram kinker, 1 Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Al-Ali, Fadwa S., Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Lee, Myeounggon, 1 Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Ibrahim, Rania Abdelaziz, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Mathew, Mincy, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Ateya, Heba Mohamed, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
  • Najafi, Bijan, 1 Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Hamad, Abdullah Ibrahim, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar
Background

People undergoing Hemodialysis (HD) have a higher burden of frailty and physical inactivity. This study aimed to quantify physical activity, strength, depression, and fall risk in people undergoing HD using gait assistive devices (GADs).

Methods

Participants undergoing routine HD were grouped based on the use of any GADs. Physical activity was measured over two consecutive days using a validated pendant sensor. Grip strength, concerns for falling and depression were assessed on FES-I and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scales.

Results

136 participants were grouped into those prescribed GADs (n = 39, age = 55.7 ± 1.3 years, female = 40.6%) and no NGAD (n = 97, age = 68.6 ± 1.4 years, female = 61.5%). The proportion with cognitive impairment (40% vs. 23%), depression (51% vs. 16%), and concern of falling (84% vs. 38%) were greater in the GAD vs. NGAD group. Furthermore, number of postural transitions was negatively correlated with FES-I (ρ = -0.33, p < 0.01) and CES-D (ρ = -0.22, p = 0.025) scores.

Conclusion

People undergoing routine HD and using GADs showed high fear of falling, depression, and cognitive decline. Furthermore, reduced postural transition was associated with heightened fear of falling and depression level.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.