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Kidney Week

Abstract: INFO05

AKINow Recovery Workgroup: Identifying Gaps in Care Post AKI

Session Information

  • Informational Posters
    November 03, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • No subcategory defined

Author

  • Ng, Jia Hwei, Northwell Health Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, United States

Group or Team Name

  • AKINow Recovery Workgroup Members
Description

The Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) Now Recovery Workgroup was developed by the American Society of Nephrology to determine gaps in care for survivors of AKI and propose solutions that promote recovery of kidney function and long-term kidney health. There is no practice standard for how to care for patients who survive an episode of AKI after hospitalization. Thus, the workgroup conducted two focus groups to understand current practices and gaps in care after an episode of AKI.

Two focus groups were held, one dedicated to care of patients who required outpatient dialysis for AKI (AKI-D) and one for those who developed AKI but did not require outpatient dialysis (AKI non-D). Diverse stakeholders were included: nephrologists, intensivists, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, patients who survived AKI and their care partners. Focus groups addressed facilitators and barriers to AKI follow-up, approaches to health care delivery (by whom, when, and how), and evidence-based practices that could improve patient outcomes. Detailed notes were taken and core concepts were summarized.

Core findings from the AKI-D focus group were that there were several barriers to optimal post-AKI care: 1) heterogeneity in the definition of kidney recovery, 2) lack of evidence on who will achieve kidney recovery, 3) lack of guidance on how to monitor kidney recovery in dialysis units, and 5) suboptimal transition of care plans. In the AKI non-D group, high variability in care delivered after hospital discharge was the core theme identified. Patients with AKI were followed up by primary care, nephrology or other specialties, and using different modalities (in-person versus telehealth). In terms of potential interventions to improve patient outcomes there was consensus on the need to resume or initiate therapies including renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors after AKI recovery, but the timing of this intervention was variable. Participants emphasized the role of physical and cognitive rehabilitation as an unaddressed part of the AKI recovery plan.

The AKINow Recovery Workgroup facilitated a multidisciplinary discussion of hospital discharge planning, interventions to impact post-AKI care, and challenges and opportunities in the care of patients with AKI. The themes identified raise awareness of post-AKI challenges and guide future research on strategies to improve post-AKI care.

Funding

  • N/A
Abstract: INFO05

AKINow Recovery Workgroup: Identifying Gaps in Care Post AKI

Session Information

  • Informational Posters
    November 04, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category:

  • No subcategory defined

Author

  • Ng, Jia Hwei, Northwell Health Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, United States
Description

The Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) Now Recovery Workgroup was developed by the American Society of Nephrology to determine gaps in care for survivors of AKI and propose solutions that promote recovery of kidney function and long-term kidney health. There is no practice standard for how to care for patients who survive an episode of AKI after hospitalization. Thus, the workgroup conducted two focus groups to understand current practices and gaps in care after an episode of AKI.

Two focus groups were held, one dedicated to care of patients who required outpatient dialysis for AKI (AKI-D) and one for those who developed AKI but did not require outpatient dialysis (AKI non-D). Diverse stakeholders were included: nephrologists, intensivists, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, patients who survived AKI and their care partners. Focus groups addressed facilitators and barriers to AKI follow-up, approaches to health care delivery (by whom, when, and how), and evidence-based practices that could improve patient outcomes. Detailed notes were taken and core concepts were summarized.

Core findings from the AKI-D focus group were that there were several barriers to optimal post-AKI care: 1) heterogeneity in the definition of kidney recovery, 2) lack of evidence on who will achieve kidney recovery, 3) lack of guidance on how to monitor kidney recovery in dialysis units, and 5) suboptimal transition of care plans. In the AKI non-D group, high variability in care delivered after hospital discharge was the core theme identified. Patients with AKI were followed up by primary care, nephrology or other specialties, and using different modalities (in-person versus telehealth). In terms of potential interventions to improve patient outcomes there was consensus on the need to resume or initiate therapies including renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors after AKI recovery, but the timing of this intervention was variable. Participants emphasized the role of physical and cognitive rehabilitation as an unaddressed part of the AKI recovery plan.

The AKINow Recovery Workgroup facilitated a multidisciplinary discussion of hospital discharge planning, interventions to impact post-AKI care, and challenges and opportunities in the care of patients with AKI. The themes identified raise awareness of post-AKI challenges and guide future research on strategies to improve post-AKI care.

Abstract: INFO05

AKINow Recovery Workgroup: Identifying Gaps in Care Post AKI

Session Information

  • Informational Posters
    November 05, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category:

  • No subcategory defined

Author

  • Ng, Jia Hwei, Northwell Health Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, United States
Description

The Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) Now Recovery Workgroup was developed by the American Society of Nephrology to determine gaps in care for survivors of AKI and propose solutions that promote recovery of kidney function and long-term kidney health. There is no practice standard for how to care for patients who survive an episode of AKI after hospitalization. Thus, the workgroup conducted two focus groups to understand current practices and gaps in care after an episode of AKI.

Two focus groups were held, one dedicated to care of patients who required outpatient dialysis for AKI (AKI-D) and one for those who developed AKI but did not require outpatient dialysis (AKI non-D). Diverse stakeholders were included: nephrologists, intensivists, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, patients who survived AKI and their care partners. Focus groups addressed facilitators and barriers to AKI follow-up, approaches to health care delivery (by whom, when, and how), and evidence-based practices that could improve patient outcomes. Detailed notes were taken and core concepts were summarized.

Core findings from the AKI-D focus group were that there were several barriers to optimal post-AKI care: 1) heterogeneity in the definition of kidney recovery, 2) lack of evidence on who will achieve kidney recovery, 3) lack of guidance on how to monitor kidney recovery in dialysis units, and 5) suboptimal transition of care plans. In the AKI non-D group, high variability in care delivered after hospital discharge was the core theme identified. Patients with AKI were followed up by primary care, nephrology or other specialties, and using different modalities (in-person versus telehealth). In terms of potential interventions to improve patient outcomes there was consensus on the need to resume or initiate therapies including renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors after AKI recovery, but the timing of this intervention was variable. Participants emphasized the role of physical and cognitive rehabilitation as an unaddressed part of the AKI recovery plan.

The AKINow Recovery Workgroup facilitated a multidisciplinary discussion of hospital discharge planning, interventions to impact post-AKI care, and challenges and opportunities in the care of patients with AKI. The themes identified raise awareness of post-AKI challenges and guide future research on strategies to improve post-AKI care.