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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO505

Overweight and Obesity Are Independently Associated with Total Kidney Volume in Children and Young Adults with ADPKD

Session Information

  • ADPKD: Clinical Studies
    October 27, 2018 | Location: Exhibit Hall, San Diego Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidney

  • 1001 Genetic Diseases of the Kidney: Cystic

Authors

  • Nowak, Kristen L., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Malaczewski, Mikaela R., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Gitomer, Berenice Y., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • George, Diana, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Chonchol, Michel, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
Background

Similar to the general population, body-mass index (BMI) in individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) has been increasing over recent decades. We recently reported that overweight and obesity are predictors of progression in adults with early-stage ADPKD who participated in the HALT-PKD study. We hypothesized that overweight and obesity would be also be independently associated with height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) even earlier in the course of the disease (children and young adults).

Methods

51 non-diabetic children and young adults (6-25 years) with ADPKD and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >90 ml/min/1.73m2 with baseline data from an ongoing clinical trial were classified as normal weight (<85th BMI percentile for age, sex, and height in children; BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2 in adults; ref; n=37), or overweight/obese (>85th BMI percentile in children; BMI >25.0 in adults; n=14), using body weights adjusted to remove the contribution of kidneys. The cross-sectional association of overweight/obesity with htTKV by magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated using multiple logistic regression models.

Results

Mean+s.d. age was 19±5 years and median htTKV was 371 (274, 509) ml/m. htTKV was greater in the overweight/obese group (532 [421, 969] ml/m) compared to the normal weight group (316 [258, 428] ml/m; p=0.01). After adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, systolic blood pressure, eGFR, and glucose, overweight/obesity was associated with increased odds of htTKV above the median compared to normal weight (Odds Ratio: 25.6; 95% Confidence Interval: 2.1, 333.3).

Conclusion

In children and young adults with ADPKD, overweight and obesity are independently associated with increased height-adjusted total kidney volume, an important predictor of progression in early-stage disease. Maintaining ideal body weight may be an important strategy to slow kidney growth in children and young adults with ADPKD.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support