ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO699

A Study Based on Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis on the Weight Gain in Peritoneal Dialysis: Fat or Muscle?

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Santa Catharina, Guilherme P., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Ferreira, Fernanda Trani, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Guimarães, Erica A., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Barsotti, Gabriel C., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Cordeiro, Lilian, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Silva, Bruno C., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Pereira, Benedito J., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Abensur, Hugo, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Elias, Rosilene M., University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Background

Patient weight gain after the beginning of Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) is a well-known phenomenon, yet whether this is resultant from increased overhydration, fat or muscle mass is not well established. Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) can assess both nutritional status and tissue hydration in these patients.

Methods

This is a cross-sectional study that included 44 incident patients on PD. A subset of 20 patients underwent BIA at baseline and 6 months after PD initiation for the following variables: fat mass (FM), muscle mass (MM), phase angle (PA), extracellular/total body water ratio (ECW/TBW). Weight, body mass index, fasting glucose, total and HDL cholesterol, albumin, creatinine and FM/MM behavior during study period were also evaluated.

Results

Patients aged 52±17 years (43% men, 30% diabetic). There was an increase in weight gain (p<0.001), with no significant increase in fasting glucose, total and HDL cholesterol. Serum albumin reduced from 3.7±0.5 to 3.5±0.6g/dl (p=0.024). Fat increased from 19±6 to 21±7kg (p=0.041), with no increase in MM (from 23±4 to 24±5kg p=0.142), PA (from 4.4±2.5 to 3.5±5.6° p=0.914), and ECW/TBW (from 0.40±0.01 to 0.40 ±0.02, p=0.667). There were 3 distinct behaviors: Group 1: increased FM/decreased MM (N=7); Group 2: decreased FM/increased MM (N=6); Group 3: increased FM and MM (N=6). Groups were similar by age, gender, albumin and presence of diabetes, albeit group 2 presented higher HDL cholesterol at 1 year (p=0.049), independent of statin prescription. [Figure 1]

Conclusion

PD is associated with weight gain, which is mostly due to a FM component. Intriguingly, some patients presented reduced FM and increased MM, and exhibited high levels of HDL cholesterol. Further studies are necessary to establish a link between weight gain, body composition and cardiovascular risk in PD patients.