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Abstract: TH-PO406

Linoleic Acid Co-Treatment Inhibits Bacterial Biofilm Formation in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) Catheter

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Ko, Gang Jee, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ahn, Shin-Young, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Cho, Eunjung, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kwon, Young-Joo, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Cha, Eunji, Korea University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Han shin, Korea University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Hee deung, Korea University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Peritonitis is a serious complication in patients receiving PD responsible for significant morbidity and technical failure. Biofilm formation of catheter is considered as an underlying mechanism for relapsing, recurrent and intractable peritonitis. However, little has been known to prevent it. Here we aimed to investigate the protective effect of linoleic acid (LA) on catheter biofilm formation, which is one of the elements of ginger extract demonstrated an inhibitory effect on biofilm of industrial and environmental settings such as water pipes system.

Methods

Biofilm was formed by overnight culture of S.aureus and P. aeruginosa (PA 14) with and without treatment of LA, and quantified by measurement of OD at 595nm after staining of crystal violet. The amount of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) attached to biofilm was also examined. Additive therapeutic effect of LA on biofilm formation was examined by co-treatment of antibiotics (cefazolin(CF) for S.aureus and tobramycin(TM) for P.aeruginosa) with LA. Intracellular cyclic digulanylate (c-di-GMP) and related gene activity under LA treatment were also examined. Cellular and functional toxicity of LA was assessed using human mesothelial cells and mice.

Results

LA treatment reduced biofilm formation (0, 10 and 100nM: 1.41±0.17, 0.95±0.11, 0.64±0.07, p<0.001, respectively), and EPS production was also markedly decreased. After LA treatment, reduction of c-di-GMP, secondary messenger of microorganism, and related gene activities were observed. Bacterial biofilm inhibitory effect was synergistically increased by co-treatment of LA (25nM) with antibiotics (CF vs. CF+LA: 0.60±0.03 vs. 0.13±0.19, TM vs. TM+LA 0.18±0.05 vs. 0.06±0.04). Cytotoxicity measured by LDH and MTS assay was not increased, and liver and renal functional and histologic abnormalities were not observed in mice after LA treatment.

Conclusion

Co-treatment of LA with antibiotics was effective to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation in catheter. It should be studied further as a therapeutic strategy to reduce recurrent peritonitis.