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Abstract: TH-PO291

Sex- and Age-Associated Differences in the Prevalence of Comorbidities in Dialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Rosen, Sophia, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Maddux, Dugan, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Larkin, John W., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Usvyat, Len A., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Maddux, Franklin W., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
Background

In dialysis patients, the presence of non-renal comorbidities is associated with decreased quality of life and poorer outcomes. The prevalence of comorbidities in dialysis may vary by sex and age. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of the common comorbidities in dialysis patients within different age groups for both women and men.

Methods

We analyzed data from all hemodialysis (HD) patients at a large dialysis provider in 2016. Patients were grouped in 14 five-year age categories from 25 years old (y/o) to 95 y/o. For each age-group, we plotted the percent (%) of patients with an active comorbidity of anemia, diabetes (DM), cardiovascular disease (CVD), hyperparathyroidism (HPT), gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, hypertension (HTN), and infection.

Results

Overall, we studied data from 230,091 patients; 43% were female. When compared to men in the same age group, we observed that: i) Anemia appears to affect a higher % of women 50 y/o and over 65 y/o, ii) Women suffer more infections at younger ages (25 y/o) and >75 y/o, iii) HTN is more prevalent in younger women (30-35 y/o) and in women >65 y/o when compared to men, iv) women show higher or similar prevalence of HPT at all ages, v) DM is more prevalent in women of most ages and, vi) CVD appear similar in men and women with a slight increase in men at age 75-85 y/o. No differences in GI bleeding were noted (Figure 1).

Conclusion

In this analysis we noted that the prevalence of comorbidities in dialysis patients varies by sex and age with a higher percent of women affected by anemia, HTN and DM. Further analyses are needed to elucidate if these differences affect dialysis outcomes.

Funding

  • Commercial Support