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Abstract: TH-PO625

Voluntary Physical Activity Improves Physical Function and Disease Outcomes in a Rat Model of CKD

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1301 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism: Basic

Authors

  • Avin, Keith, Indiana University-Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Chen, Neal X., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Srinivasan, Shruthi, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • O'Neill, Kalisha, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Allen, Matthew R., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Moe, Sharon M., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Background

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression is associated with reduced muscle size, strength and overall mobility. Previous studies using exercise as an intervention for CKD have been inconclusive. We hypothesized that physical activity would attenuate musculoskeletal dysfunction and CKD-related outcomes.

Methods

Four groups of rats were used: 1) CKD, 2) CKD + voluntary wheel running, 3) Normal littermates (NL) and 4) NL with voluntary wheel running (N=12/gr). Wheels were freely accessible in animal cages. Data collection began at 25 weeks (~CKD stage 2-3) and ended at 35 weeks of age (~stage 5 CKD). Muscle strength (i.e. maximal voluntary grip), maximal aerobic capacity (VO2 max), were tested at 25 and 35 weeks; serum biochemistries were assessed at 35 weeks. Data was analyzed via one-way ANOVA with post-hoc comparisons.

Results

CKD rats performed the same average wheel distance/day and speed as NL animals indicating exercise tolerability. Wheel running had negligible effects in NL animals. In contrast, wheel running significantly improved multiple outcomes in CKD rats: 1) significantly reduced phosphorous, PTH and FGF23 (Table 1); 2) reduced kidney weight and left ventricular mass index (-12%, p<0.05; -8.5%, p<0.01, respectively); 3) reduced serum oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG by (-45%, p<0.05); 4) improved grip strength by 16% compared to 10% reduction in CKD alone (p<0.05); and 5) Increased time to fatigue (min) during VO2 testing (12.6 min, 8.5 min, p<0.001) but did not change maximal oxygen capacity.

Conclusion

In a progressive rat model of CKD, voluntary wheel running had significant improvement of the biochemistry, tissue weights, oxidative stress and physical function. The results suggest that physical activity may have beneficial effects in CKD.

Table 1. Biochemistry of CKD and CKD Wheel at 35 weeks of age
 BUNCa++PhosphorousPTHFGF23
 MeanSDMeanSDMeanSDMeanSDMeanSD
CKD44.47.89.451.56.11.180353936442757
CKD+Wheel39.5*5.48.171.85.2*1.3522*1971912*1337

*p<0.05, CKD vs. CKD Wheel n=10-14 rats each group *p<0.05, CKD vs. CKD Wheel n=10-14 rats each group

Funding

  • NIDDK Support