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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1310

Peritoneal Dialysis or Haemodialysis for Polycystic Kidney Disease? Ten Years' Experience in a Single Centre

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Chan, Zi, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Chan, Ka Lok, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Lam, Chi Kwan, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Law, Wai ping, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Pak, Wai lun will, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Wong, Patrick Yick Hei, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Wong, Sunny Sze ho, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Background

When polycystic kidney disease (PKD) progresses into end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the choice of dialysis modality is not straight forward. PKD may increase risk of complication and technique failure (TF) in peritoneal dialysis (PD). We looked at the long-term outcomes of PKD patients put on either PD or haemodialysis (HD).

Methods

New cases of ESRD due to PKD entered into dialysis program of a regional hospital in Hong Kong from December 2009 to November 2019 were identified. Their baseline demographics, mean kidney size and clinical outcomes were recorded. Hong Kong has a ‘PD first’ policy. But for PKD patients, the decision to start PD or HD is by the nephrologists’ clinical judgment. For statistical analysis, chi-square test and t-test were used for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Kaplan-Meier curve was used to analyse survival.

Results

A total of 45 patients were identified, 31 were put on PD, 14 were put on HD. Their baseline characteristics were shown in Table 1. HD patients had higher mean kidney size to body weight ratio compared to PD patients. The median survival of those on PD (7.1 years) and HD (7.2 years) were not significantly different.

For patients on PD, the 5 year TF rate was 0.22, which was similar to overall PD patients in our centre. Four patients had early TF (mean time 1.6 years). Two of them had significant pressure symptoms, the other two had inadequate dialysis. Further analysis showed that for those with TF, both mean kidney size and mean kidney size to body weight ratio were significantly higher than those without TF (Table 2).

Conclusion

This study showed that for PKD patients with moderate enlarged kidneys, PD could be a reasonable choice. However, for patients with very large kidneys, early TF rate with PD was high, HD would be a better choice for these patients.