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Abstract: PO1297

Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Technique Training: What Features Influence Learning Time?

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Sosa Barrios, Haridian, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Burguera, Victor, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Campillo, Cristina, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Ortego, Sofia, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Lopez Melero, Eva, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Álvarez nadal, Marta, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Villa, Daniel Eduardo, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • Rivera, Maite, Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Background

The adequate training of patients started on PD is an essential issue for technique success and basic to avoid and/or reduce complications. However, features affecting training duration have not been sufficiently studied so far.
AIM: Identify features influencing PD training duration and their relation to first peritonitis episode timing and permanence on PD.

Methods

We retrospectively analysed all training sessions done with first time PD starters in our Unit (January 2001-December 2018). Demographic data on age, gender, end ESRD cause, Charlson morbidity index (CCI), number of training sessions, type of PD start, employment and education status, derivation and PD technique were recorded.

Results

188 patients were trained, 72% male .Median age 55.49±15 yr. 25% were diabetic. Mean CCI: 4.9. Our patients required a median of 10 sessions (range 2-28) to gain sufficient skills performing the PD technique and feel confident, with a median of 19 days.
Number of training sessions required increased with higher age (p< 0.05), higher CCI (p< 0.05) and diabetics (p< 0.05). Neither gender, cohabitation, type of PD start, education level, derivation type nor employment status were statistically significant factors affecting PD training.
Assisted PD patients were older (54 vs 71 yo, p=0.00) and they required a higher number of training sessions (10 vs 15.7 sessions). Patients requiring longer training (>23 days) had more peritonitis episodes (p< 0.05), the first peritonitis episode happened sooner (15.7 vs 17.4 months, p=NS) and they remained less time on PD (32.57 vs 27.7 months, p< 0.01).

Conclusion

The PD training time needed depends on patient’s age, diabetic status and comorbidities but does not relate to social, educational nor employment status. Patient’s requiring less training sessions have less peritonitis episodes and it happens later, remaining longer on PD technique.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.