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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0411

Dietary Intake and Risk of Incident and Recurrent Kidney Stones

Session Information

Category: Bone and Mineral Metabolism

  • 402 Bone and Mineral Metabolism: Clinical

Authors

  • Chewcharat, Api, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Taylor, Eric N., VA Maine Healthcare System, Augusta, Maine, United States
  • Thongprayoon, Charat, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Vaughan, Lisa E., Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Mehta, Ramila A., Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Enders, Felicity T., Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Lieske, John C., Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Rule, Andrew D., Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
Background

Dietary factors associated with recurrent kidney stones (KS) may differ from those associated with incident KS.

Methods

We recruited adult incident symptomatic KS formers and controls from local residents surrounding the Mayo Clinics in Minnesota and Florida between 2009 and 2018. Participants were administered a Viocare Food Frequency Questionnaire, a KS survey, and completed a 24h urine chemistry evaluation at a baseline study visit. Medical records of stone formers were reviewed for symptomatic recurrence with a visually confirmed stone through May 2019. Analyses compared baseline dietary factors between incident symptomatic stone formers and controls and assessed whether these same dietary factors predicted symptomatic recurrence.

Results

There were 416 incident symptomatic KS formers (74 had a recurrence during follow-up) and 384 controls. Higher dietary potassium, calcium and phytate were associated with lower odds of an incident symptomatic KS adjusting for age, race, BMI, underlying diseases, family history of KS, education status, fluid and energy intake. During median follow-up time of 4.1 years, higher dietary calcium and lower oxalate intake predicted a lower risk of symptomatic KS recurrence (Hazard ratio for highest tertile vs lowest tertile = 0.53, 95%CI [0.28, 0.99] and 2.09, 95%CI [1.18, 3.69], respectively) adjusting for BMI, fluid and energy intake, and Recurrence of Kidney Stone score. (Table)

Conclusion

Certain dietary factors may differ in their association with incident and recurrent KS. In particular, dietary oxalate intake may be more important for preventing recurrence than for preventing a first KS episode.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support