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Abstract: PO1103

Feasibility of and Adherence to Using a Wrist-Based Activity Tracker in Hemodialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Han, Maggie, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Preciado, Priscila, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Thwin, Ohnmar, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Tao, Xia, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Tapia, Mirell, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Rivera Fuentes, Lemuel, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Hakim, Mohamad I., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Patel, Amrish U., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Grobe, Nadja, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Thijssen, Stephan, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Kotanko, Peter, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
Background

Wearables allow insights into patient’s status outside the clinical setting. We aim to quantify how long patients will use a wearable device before requiring an intervention to improve adherence.

Methods

Hemodialysis (HD) patients were enrolled from 4 clinics in New York City from May 2018 and followed for up to 1 year. Patients ≥18 years, on HD ≥3 months, able to walk, owning a smartphone, mobile tablet or PC were enrolled, provided with a Fitbit Charge 2, and instructed on how to use the device and sync data. If a patient failed to sync data for 7 consecutive days, a SMS or email reminder was sent. Time to first intervention (TFI) was evaluated using Kaplan Meier time-to-event analysis. Predictors of TFI, including gender, age, living situation, and education level, was assessed via univariate Cox Regression. Patients were censored at the end of the observation period.

Results

125 patients were enrolled into our study and 7 failed screening. At enrollment, patients were 54±12 years old with a dialysis vintage of 5.6±5.8 years; 37% lived alone, 56% were single, 59% unemployed, 64% were African American, and 42% had an education level of some college or higher. 82% of the patients required a text message reminder. Mean and median TFI were 101 days (95% CI 80 to 123) and 50 days (95% CI 35 to 70 days), respectively. The probability of no intervention is shown in Figure 1. None of the a priori defined parameters were significant predictors of TFI.

Conclusion

Majority of patients studied required at least some intervention to maintain the use of a wrist-based wearable device. While most patients require an intervention before 2 months, the patients who maintain use independently after that point are unlikely to require intervention.

Funding

  • Commercial Support