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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0494

Relationship Between Renal Function and Quality of Life in Patients with CKD at the Pre-Dialysis Stage

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Nakamura, Hironori, Department of nephrology, Shinonoi General Hospital, Nagano, Japan
  • Murakami, Minoru, Department of Nephrology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku, Japan
  • Mariko, Anayama, Department of nephrology, Shinonoi General Hospital, Nagano, Japan
  • Kurihara, Shigekazu, Department of nephrology, Shinonoi General Hospital, Nagano, Japan
  • Makino, Yasushi, Department of nephrology, Shinonoi General Hospital, Nagano, Japan
  • Nagasawa, Masaki, Department of nephrology, Shinonoi General Hospital, Nagano, Japan
  • Kashihara, Naoki, REACH-J Steering committee, Tukuba, Japan
  • Yamagata, Kunihiro, REACH-J Steering committee, Tukuba, Japan
  • Wada, Takashi, REACH-J Steering committee, Tukuba, Japan
  • Narita, Ichiei, REACH-J Steering committee, Tukuba, Japan
  • Okada, Hirokazu, REACH-J Steering committee, Tukuba, Japan
Background

There have been several studies evaluating the effect of kidney function on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, the association between kidney function and the burden of kidney disease, symptoms, and the effects of kidney disease among patients with advanced-stage kidney disease remains unclear.

Methods

The nationwide prospective Reach-J cohort study was successfully conducted. Of these patients, 2,248 with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G3b (n = 632), G4 (n = 1010), and G5 (n = 606) were included in our study. A questionnaire regarding the kidney-disease-specific domains of quality of life (QOL) including burden, symptoms, and the effects of kidney disease at the baseline was cross-sectionally evaluated. Moreover, factors influencing the QOL were studied.

Results

Patients’ characteristics were as follows: age, 69.1±12.6 years; male, 64.6%; estimated glomerular filtration rate, 23.2 ± 10.4 mL/min/1.73m2; and serum creatinine level was 2.64 ± 1.49 mg/dL. The rates of comorbidities were as follows: diabetes, 33.6%; hypertension, 87.3%; ischemic heart disease, 8.2%; and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 2.3%. Crude scores in CKDG4 and CKDG5 as comparison to CKDG3b were as follows: burdens, -8.7 and -17.5; symptoms; -2.1 and -4.5; effects of kidney disease, -4.4 and -8.1, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, COPD, and CKD stage; multivariate analysis to identify independent factors that caused reduced QOL scores revealed that age (β = 0.053, p = 0.024), BMI (β = 0.091, p < 0.001), diabetes (β = −0.058, p = 0.014), and CKD stage (β = −0.25, p < 0.001) were significant factors for burden; that age (β =−0.153, p < 0.001), diabetes (β =−0.093, p < 0.001), and CKD stage (β =−0.11, p < 0.001) were significant factors for symptoms; and that age (β = −0.128, p < 0.001), BMI (β = 0.067, p = 0.005), diabetes (β = −0.066, p = 0.006) and CKD stage (β = −0.196, p < 0.001) were significant factors for the effects of kidney disease.

Conclusion

This study suggests that the progression of CKD stage could be associated with a reduction in some aspects of HRQOL in advanced-stage CKD patients.