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Abstract: PO2051

Effects of Resistant Starch (RS) Type 2 Cookies on Gut Microbiota Profile in Hemodialysis (HD) Patients

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Mafra, Denise, Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Kemp, Julie ann, Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Esgalhado, Marta, Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Paiva, Bruna, Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • de Jesus, Hugo E., Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Santos, Henrique Fragoso dos, Federal University Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Background

Dysbiosis is recognized as a new cardiovascular risk factor in HD patients. In this context, nutritional strategies as the use of high amylose RS have been proposed to modulate the gut microbiota in HD patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluated the effects of RS supplementation on gut microbiota modulation in HD patients.

Methods

This double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated HD patients randomized in two groups, RS or placebo. They received 9 cookies/day (16g of RS - Hi-Maize 260, Ingredion®), in the HD days and 1 sachet/day in non-HD days for 4 weeks. The placebo group received manioc flour. Fecal bacteriome composition and diversity were evaluated by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene.

Results

Twenty patients concluded the study: 10 in the RS group (3 ♂, 53.2 ± 12.3 yrs, BMI, 24.6 ± 3.9 Kg/m2) and 10 in the placebo group (8 ♂, 55.1 ± 11.1 yrs, BMI, 25.6 ± 4.9 Kg/m2). Microbial diversity (Shannon index) and richness (ACE) were similar in both groups at baseline. RS supplementation increased mainly the relative abundance of the genus Ruminococcus 2 and maintained genus Blautia, while the placebo group decreased both of these genera, as showed in the Fig 1. After RS supplementation the beta diversity (PCA) changed, increasing the short-chain fatty acid producers, which are related to benefits effects.

Conclusion

The RS supplementation was able to change the gut microbiota in HD patients. Linking these results with our previous studies, which RS was able to reduce the inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and uremic toxins plasma levels in HD patients, we suggest that RS can be a good nutritional strategy to modulate the gut microbiota in HD patients.

Fig. 1: Relative abundance at genus level from RS and Placebo group.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.