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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0796

Remote Peritoneal Dialysis Training in a COVID-19-Positive Patient

Session Information

Category: Trainee Case Report

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Jain, Aditya Vikram, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Samuel, Tina S., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Jansto, Leslie A., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Morales, Erwin E., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Ghossein, Cybele, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Introduction

Training patients in peritoneal dialysis (PD) traditionally requires up to fourteen in-person clinic visits to cover all aspects of care. The COVID-19 crisis has created an unprecedented challenge in educating patients to perform PD safely while minimizing exposure to staff. Telemedicine has been well-received by staff and patients in other aspects of PD care. We present a case of a COVID-19 positive patient who was fully trained in PD using telemedicine.

Case Description

The patient is a 21-year-old man with VATER Syndrome who progressed to ESRD with uremic symptoms. He chose PD as his dialysis modality while awaiting a kidney transplant. Prior to his PD catheter insertion, he tested positive for COVID-19. He was deemed an ideal candidate for PD training via telemedicine and agreed to proceed. For the first two training sessions, he presented to the PD clinic and was placed in a designated isolation room with his personal computer. His PD nurse was in an adjoining room and trained him via video conferencing with the option to enter his room if needed. The patient quickly mastered the procedure in this monitored environment. He completed the remainder of the required education remotely in his home via telemedicine. Currently, he is fully trained and has initiated his full PD prescription.

Discussion

There are several advantages of telehealth in COVID-19 patients. The risk of viral exposure to healthcare staff and other patients is reduced by limiting trips to the PD clinic. Additionally, reducing the burden of travel saves time and expense for the patient. Patient selection for telehealth learning is critical: the ideal patient must be motivated and technologically savvy. The patient, PD nurse, and nephrologist must jointly determine whether proceeding with tele-learning is feasible and safe. Although remote videoconferencing is not the conventional or optimal method for PD education, it can be used successfully to train patients while minimizing exposure of COVID-19 to staff.