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Abstract: PO2295

FCGG Renal Biopsy Network: First Epidemiological Report on Pediatric Renal Disease

Session Information

Category: Pediatric Nephrology

  • 1700 Pediatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Knops, Noel, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Flanders, Belgium
  • De Meester, Johan MJ, AZ Nikolaas, Sint-Niklaas, Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium
  • Dendooven, Amélie, Universitair Ziekenhuis Gent, Gent, Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium
  • Laurens, Wim, AZ Nikolaas, Sint-Niklaas, Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium
  • Sprangers, Ben, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Flanders, Belgium
  • Levtchenko, Elena N., Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Flanders, Belgium
Background

In 2016, a regional renal biopsy network was founded as a collaboration between renal pathologists and nephrologists in order to standardize diagnosis and therapy. Uniform renal biopsy request and renal biopsy report forms were introduced, together with a new comprehensive list of renal pathology diagnoses for coding purposes. The 2017-2018 epidemiological data of the pediatric patients (age 0-17 years) are presented.

Methods

Following informed consent and in compliance with GDPR, data registration consists of basic patient and categorical renal data, semi-structured medical information of renal disease, structured information of renal histopathology, and the clinical renal disease.

Results

In 2017 and 2018, 92 renal biopsies were performed in pediatric patients (age = 0-17 years) or 3.6 per 100,000 pediatric inhabitants per year. Three clinical patterns were equally represented: only proteinuria >1g/day; only hematuria; and combination of proteinuria and hematuria. Acute or chronic renal failure were rare. In the youngest age group (0-5 years; N=26) minimal change disease predominated, followed by Henoch-Schönlein nephritis. The middle age group (6-11 years; N=32) mainly presented with diseases characterized by hematuria: IgA nephropathy, Henoch-Schönlein nephritis and Alport’s disease. A more diverse renal disease spectrum was present in the highest age group (12-18 years; N=34): IgA nephropathy, different forms of proliferative glomerulonephritis and of nephrotic syndrome of childhood. Patients with a Caucasian descent presented with IgA nephropathy, while a nephrotic syndrome was more common in those without a Caucasian descent. Alport’s disease was particularly diagnosed in female patients, IgA nephropathy in male patients, and the gender distribution was equal in minimal change disease.

Conclusion

The FCGG network provides a better cross-talk between renal pathologists and nephrologists. For the first time, reliable estimates of pediatric renal diseases based on histology are available; genetic analyses are not yet included. Efforts to coordinate clinical care of pediatric renal diseases in the region are ongoing.