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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2031

Dietary Fiber Intake, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Kidney Function: A Mediation Analysis

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Jutras, Gabrielle, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur De Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Genest, Suzanne Dominique, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur De Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Bernier-Jean, Amelie, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur De Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Goupil, Remi, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur De Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • Madore, Francois, Hôpital Sacré-Coeur De Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Background

Higher fiber intake may be associated with higher eGFR but the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. Considering that higher fiber intake is linked to improved cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, we hypothesize that the effect of fiber intake on eGFR could be mediated by these CV factors.

Methods

CARTaGENE is a population survey of healthy adults. We used multiple linear regression to study the association between fiber intake and eGFR while adjusting for confounding factors, including age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, body mass index [BMI], smoking, prior CV disease, physical activity and caloric intake. We assessed whether CV risk factors lie in the causal pathway between fiber intake and eGFR through mediation analyses.

Results

We included 9,854 of the CARTaGENE participants with a completed food questionnaire (mean age: 53 years, 56% males). The main comorbidities were hypertension (25%), diabetes (8%) and cardiovascular disease (7%). The median daily fiber intake was 17.2g (IQR 10.7-23.7) and the mean eGFR was 87.3 ±14.6 mL/min/1.73 m2. After adjustment for the above factors, fiber intake was associated with higher eGFR and serum HDL levels, and lower BMI, glycated hemoglobin and triglyceride levels (Table). Other risk factors were found to be non-significant. The mediation analysis demonstrated that only 10% of the effect of fiber intake on eGFR was mediated through BMI and triglyceride levels.

Conclusion

Higher dietary fiber intake is associated with higher eGFR and better control of certain cardiovascular risk factors. While the association between fiber intake and kidney function may be marginally mediated by healthy weight and triglyceride levels, further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms underlying this association.

Association between dietary fiber intake and clinical variables.
 B coefficient†
(95% CI)
p
eGFR0.08 mL/min/1.73m2
(0.03, 0.13)
0.02
Body mass index-0.06 kg/m2
(-0.08, -0.04)
0.001
HDL levels0.002 mg/dL
(0.001, 0.003)
0.02
Triglyceride levels-0.01mmol/L
(-0.01, -0.001)
0.001
Glycated hemoglobin-0.002%
(-0.005, -0.001)
0.03

† Adjusted for the variables included in the table and age, sex, smoking, caloric intake, physical activity, hypertension, history of cardiovascular disease. CI, confidence interval.