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Abstract: PO2407

Differences in Urinary Inflammatory Profiles in Donor-Recipient Pairs

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Spiwak, Elizabeth, Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Nailescu, Corina, Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Schwaderer, Andrew L., Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Background

Renal transplant is the most common type of transplant performed in the US. Immunosuppressants are used in transplant recipients to prevent rejection. Kidney transplant recipients are at a higher risk for infection in the pre- and post-transplant state. Urine inflammatory profiles may lend insight to this balance between infection and rejection. Since donor and recipient urine is generated by genetically identical kidneys, it represents an ideal biosample for paired analysis.

Methods

Urine samples were obtained from stable children > 2 months post-transplant along with their donors (n=6) and another 8 recipient donor-recipient pairs (adult and children) that were collected for longitudinal samples; of which a pretransplant sample has been obtained. Using the V_PLEX Human CytoKine Panel (Mesoscale Discovery, Rockville MD) urine inflammatory mediators were quantified. The paired T-test or Wilcoxon test for parametric and nonparametric data respectively

Results

Interleukin (IL)7, IL15, Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were higher in the pediatric post-transplant recipients compared to their donors P values of 0.017, 0.037, 0.046 and 0.031 respectively. IL-9 was higher in recipient urine in pre-transplant patients (p=0.004) compared to donors.

Conclusion

Transplant patients have an elevated urine inflammatory mediator profile. Pretransplant patients have elevated IL-9 compared to their donors. Reasons for this altered inflammatory profile include immunologic, hemodynamic or physiologic changes intrinsic to the transplant procedure versus medications used to manage transplant patients.

Figure 1. Catheterized urine samples from recipients at time of transplant have higher levels of IL-9 than their donors

Funding

  • NIDDK Support