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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0573

Telehealth for Adults with CKD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Luo, Li, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Zhang, Min, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Zhang, Dingjun, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Chen, Huifen, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Zhang, La, Renal Division, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine), Guangzhou, China
  • Xia, Bingqing, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Tan, Jiaowang, Renal Division, Bejing University of Chinese Medicine Shenzhen Hospital, Guangzhou, China
  • Dong, Chendi, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Xu, Yanmin, The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China
  • Liu, Xusheng, Renal Division, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine), Guangzhou, China
  • Wu, Yifan, Renal Division, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine (Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine), Guangzhou, China
Background

Evidence has supported improved quality of CKD care when assisted with telehealth, while these results were predominantly based on cohort observation or small-scale randomized controlled trials(RCTs). Moreover, robust findings regarding its effects on endpoints were still limited. This study thus aimed to evaluate impacts of telehealth on non-dialysis CKD patients.

Methods

This study was conducted and reported according to PRISMA statement. We searched databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang Database and VIP Database until 2019 April. Relevant studies regarding telehealth for non-dialysis CKD population were screened, reviewed, selected and assessed of quality for systematic review and meta-analysis. The protocol was registered at PROSPERO(CRD42017073665).

Results

Eighteen trials involving 4749 patients were included for systematic review and 4 for further meta-analysis. The qualitative study summarized different study population, telehealth intervention type(consultation, education, monitoring) and variable results of outcomes measured(endpoints, surrogate values, patient-centered outcomes). The quantitative analysis comparing the telehealth and control group detected no significant difference in systolic blood pressure(SBP), diastolic blood pressure(DBP) and serum creatinine(SCr) at 12 months, but found significantly lower SCr level at 6 months, preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR) at 6 months and at 12 months in telehealth group.

Conclusion

This study detected advantages of telehealth on delaying CKD progression but uncertain impacts on decreasing endpoint incidence.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.