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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0085

Clinical Characteristics and In-Hospital Outcomes for 1519 Consecutive Patients with AKI

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 102 AKI: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Montgomerie, Christina I., Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Nephrology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Spaak, Jonas, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, division of Cardioloy, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Evans, Marie, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge Department of Renal Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Jacobson, Stefan H., Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Nephrology, Stockholm, Sweden
Background

Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in about 15% of hospitalized patients. Patients who recover from AKI have a higher long-term risk of end-stage kidney disease and death. The aim of this large single center study was to report differences in laboratory findings and short-term hospital outcomes in relation to cause of AKI in consecutive patients in a nephrology department.

Methods

All patients diagnosed with AKI between 2009 and 2018 and admitted to the nephrology department at Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, were included. Relevant laboratory and physiological measures were registered. Patients on dialysis treatment were excluded. Patients were followed until discharge or death, whichever came first.

Results

In 1519 AKI patients, the majority (n=687) was of prerenal, followed by combined (defined as chronic kidney disease combined with any type of AKI) (n=536), renal (n=166), and postrenal (n=130) etiology. Patients with renal AKI were younger, had longer duration of stay, and had higher bicarbonate levels on admission. 63.2% of patients had a sCr decrease of at least 30% from admission during their stay. Most of these had prerenal followed by postrenal etiology. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality between the four etiologies of AKI.

Conclusion

This study provides data from a large, contemporary AKI patient cohort under nephrology care. We confirm that patient characteristics as well as short-term outcomes differ substantially in patients of variable AKI etiology. Greatest in-hospital reduction of sCr was seen in patients with prerenal and postrenal AKI, whereas patients with renal and combined AKI had poorer renal recovery. These findings have important implications for prognostic evaluation upon admission and further resource planning.

Characteristics of study population

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support