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Abstract: PO1873

Family History of Diabetes Is Associated with Progression of Kidney Disease: The CureGN and CRIC studies

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1203 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Zanoni, Francesca, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Verbitsky, Miguel, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Marasa, Maddalena, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Bundy, Joshua David, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Parsa, Afshin, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Kiryluk, Krzysztof, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Feldman, Harold I., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Gharavi, Ali G., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
Background

Family history (FHx) of complex traits may reflect shared genetic/environmental risk. We studied associations of FHx with presentation patterns, comorbidities and renal disease progression in a prospective cohort of primary GN and one of non-GN chronic kidney disease(CKD).

Methods

The Cure Glomerulopathy Network(CureGN) is a prospective multi-center study of patients(N=2474-median age 29 years)with biopsy-proven GN. Associations of self-reported FHx of diabetes(DM),cancer(C), clotting disorders(CD), and autoimmune diseases(AD) with eGFR and comorbidities prevalence were studied with multivariable regression models. We investigated associations of FHx and end-stage renal disease/50%eGFR decline(ESRD/50%eGFR) with multivariate Cox models. The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study, a multi-center prospective study of 3939 adult(median age 59 years)CKD patients, was used for replication.

Results

FHx of DM predicted lower eGFR at diagnosis(p=0.002) in CureGN. Figure 1 summarizes associations of FHx of complex traits with comorbidities in CureGN. FHx of DM was associated with higher odds of DM(OR 1.56, 95%CI 1.16-2.09, p=0.003)in the subgroup of CRIC with no DM at baseline. After adjustment for relevant covariates, FHx of DM was associated with higher risk of the composite outcome of ESRD/50%eGFR reduction in both CureGN (HR 1.43, 95%CI 1.06-1.94, p=0.02) and CRIC (HR 1.15, 95%CI 1.01-1.31, p=0.038).

Conclusion

FHx of complex traits are associated with specific comorbidities. FHx of DM identifies patients with lower eGFR and disease progression. In conclusion, FHx could be an additional parameter for risk stratification and management of CKD.

Figure1:FHx and comorbidity prevalence in CureGN. CVD: cardiovascular disease.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support