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Abstract: PO1919

Clinical Outcomes in Lupus Nephritis by Renal Response Status: A Retrospective Analysis of the Hopkins Lupus Cohort

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1203 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Petri, Michelle, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Fu, Qinggong, GlaxoSmithKline, Upper Providence, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Green, Yulia, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, United Kingdom
  • Madan, Anuradha, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Goldman, Daniel W., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Cooper-Blenkinsopp, Selin, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, United Kingdom
Background

A retrospective analysis of the Hopkins Lupus Cohort (a prospective, longitudinal study of patients [pts] with systemic lupus erythematosus) reported that renal response (complete/partial/none) at 24 months post-diagnosis of lupus nephritis (LN) predicts long-term renal survival.1 Here, we compare long-term renal survival and chronic renal insufficiency-free survival in pts with and without a renal response (RR) to standard LN therapy, as defined by primary endpoint in the Phase 3 BLISS-LN study (GSK Study BEL114054; NCT01639339).

Methods

This retrospective analysis (GSK Study 213039) of the Hopkins Lupus Cohort included pts with biopsy-proven class III, IV, or V LN. Endpoints were: long-term renal survival (no end-stage renal disease [ESRD] and/or mortality) and long-term chronic renal insufficiency-free survival by RR status at 24 months post-biopsy, both assessed by Kaplan−Meier plots with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results

173 pts with LN were included; 91.3% were female and mean (SD) age at biopsy was 36.2 (11.8) years. At 24 months post-biopsy, 114 (65.9%) pts achieved RR. Pts with RR at 24 months were less likely to experience an ESRD/mortality event and chronic renal insufficiency (Figure), even after adjusting for covariates (HR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.13, 0.87], p=0.0255; and HR [95% CI] 0.26 [0.14, 0.47], p<0.0001, respectively).

Conclusion

Achieving BLISS-LN primary endpoint defined RR at 24 months post-biopsy is associated with long-term renal survival and chronic renal insufficiency-free survival in pts with LN.

1Davidson JE, et al. J Rheumatol 2018;45:671–7.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support