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Abstract: PO2084

Under Diagnosis of Pediatric Hypertension

Session Information

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1401 Hypertension and CVD: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Moin, Anoosh, Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Langman, Craig B., Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Background

Pediatric hypertension is associated with target organ damage in children and cardiovascular morbidity in adults. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are critical. Application of clinical practice guidelines is inconsistent.

Methods

Using electronic health record data (from 8 community centers), we evaluated the proportion of children (3-18 years) with elevated blood pressures (>90th percentile) who were appropriately diagnosed as either hypertension or elevated blood pressure over 1 year (2016-17), and provided guideline directed follow-up; by age, sex, race/ethnicity and weight.

Results

The sample included 6233 children with elevated blood pressure, 15% were appropriately diagnosed. These children were more likely to be older, white, and obese. 55 children met criteria for hypertension with 23 being appropriately diagnosed, there was no difference by patient characteristics. Of children with blood pressure ≥95th percentile, 13% had follow-up within 1 month; they were more likely to be older, female, of Hispanic ethnicity or ‘other’ race. Of children with blood pressure ≥90th percentile, 41% had follow-up within 6 months, and were more likely to be older, of either white, Hispanic, Asian race or Hispanic ethnicity.

Conclusion

We found persistent underdiagnosis of pediatric hypertension and elevated blood pressure as well as disparities in the diagnosis of elevated blood pressure and guideline-directed follow-up among diverse children in a community setting. New strategies are needed to improve compliance with guidelines.

Proportion of children who are appropriately diagnosed

Proportion of children with appropriate follow-up

Funding

  • Other NIH Support