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Abstract: PO0425

Sex Differences in CKD Prevalence in Asia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Hockham, Carinna, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Bao, Lexia, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Tiku, Anushree, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Badve, Sunil, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Gallagher, Martin P., The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jardine, Meg J., The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jha, Vivekanand, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Woodward, Mark, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Jun, Min, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Background

Individual studies reporting sex-specific chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevalence in Asia have shown inconsistent sex differences in CKD prevalence. We sought to synthesise available sex-disaggregated data to better define and compare CKD prevalence in women and men in Asia.

Methods

We systematically searched the literature for observational studies of ≥500 adults reporting sex-disaggregated CKD prevalence data in Asia. We calculated the women-to-men prevalence ratio (PR) for each study and pooled these using random-effects meta-analysis. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore potential sources of heterogeneity in the PR.

Results

Sex-disaggregated CKD prevalence data were available for 12 of the 26 Asian countries (109 studies; 1,452,308 women and 1,391,995 men). Most studies (83%) came from China, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea. Sex-specific CKD prevalence estimates varied substantially between studies (median [IQR] reported prevalence was 19% [9-35%] in women and 17% [8-28%] in men). Overall, CKD prevalence was higher in women compared to men (pooled PR 1.14; 95%CI 1.07-1.21), with evidence of significant heterogeneity (I2=99%). In subgroup analyses, prevalence was higher in women among studies with a younger mean age, a higher proportion of diabetes and that defined CKD using eGFR only (Table 1). The pooled PR varied considerably by country.

Conclusion

Existing sex-disaggregated data suggest a higher overall prevalence of CKD in women compared to men in Asia. However, adequate assessment of sex differences in CKD prevalence is limited by the absence of sex-disaggregated data for a large part of the region. Standardised reporting of sex-disaggregated CKD prevalence data in Asia is needed.

Table 1 Subgroup analyses of the pooled PR.