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Abstract: PO2080

Obesity-Related Renal Damage in Adolescent Women: Body Surface Area Matters

Session Information

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1401 Hypertension and CVD: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Bielopolski, Dana, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Singh, Neha, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Jiang, Caroline S., The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Macarthur, Robert B., The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Vasquez, Kimberly S., The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Moftah, Dena S., Clinical Directors Network Inc., New York, New York, United States
  • Kost, Rhonda, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Tobin, Jonathan N., Clinical Directors Network Inc., New York, New York, United States
Background

Obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor for the development and progression of kidney disease, both in adults and children. We aim to assess the prevalence of early signs of kidney dysfunction among overweight and obese adolescents by examining routine labs including creatinine for hyperfiltration and albuminuria.

Methods

De-identified electronic health record (EHR) data were extracted for female adolescents aged 12-21 years, who received health care services from 1/1/2011 to 12/31/2015 in NYC from 12 academic health centers and community health centers that are part of PCORnet NYC Clinical Data Research Network (NYC-CDRN). Data were analyzed using SAS (v 3.2.5) on 60,549 unique subjects. Patient characteristics overall and by subgroups were examined using standard summary statistics. BMI groups were coded according to NHANES as underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese. Multiple linear regression analyses will control for covariates.

Results

Mean creatinine values were similar between normal weight, overweight and obese BMI groups, yet after calculating eGFR and adjusting for BSA, significant and alarming differences appeared. Obese adolescent women had significantly higher eGFR, estimated by CKD-EPI and the Schwartz formula according to age, compared to normal weight subjects. Only subjects in the obese group (BMI>30) exhibited hyperfiltration (eGFR>135 ml/min). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure across the four BMI groups increased linearly with a statistically significant trend (p<0.0001), even though means were within normal limits.

Conclusion

Obese adolescent women present with significant alteration in kidney function that without intervention will lead to ESRD, and adverse outcomes associated with the deleterious effects of adiposity. Awareness should be raised to consider body size when estimating GFR in adolescents.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support