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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0551

Alterations of Gray Matter Volumes and Connectivity in Patients with CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Heo, Changmin, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yang Wook, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Yoo jin, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Sihyung, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Bongsoo, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yoon, Eunjae, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Our previous study demonstrated that patients in End stage renal disease had decreased structural and functional brain connectivity, and there was significant association between brain connectivity and cognitive function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the alterations of structural and functional connectivity using graph theoretical analysis in the neurologically asymptomatic patients with relatively early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Methods

We prospectively enrolled neurologically asymptomatic 20 patients with CKD stage 3 and 20 healthy controls, and all of the subjects underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). Using data from the structural and functional connectivity matrix based on DTI and rs-fMRI, we calculated network measures, including global efficiency, local efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, and small-worldness index, and investigated the differences between the patients with CKD and healthy controls.

Results

The patients with CKD had altered global structural connectivity and preserved functional connectivity compared to healthy controls. The all of the measures of global structural connectivity were significantly different between the patients with CKD and healthy controls. However, all of the measures of global functional connectivity in the CKD patients were not different from those in healthy participants. In the CKD patients, the functional betweenness centrality of the right insular cortex, right occipital pole, and right thalamus was significantly different from that in healthy subjects. The structural betweenness centrality of the left calcarine, right posterior cingulum was significantly different from that in healthy subjects.

Conclusion

There were significant alterations of global structural connectivity between patients with CKD and control. However, functional connectivity of brain network was preserved in contrast to ESRD patients.