ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2592

Contraceptive Use Among Women with Kidney Transplants in the United States

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Shah, Silvi, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • Harrison, Kathleen, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • Christianson, Annette, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
Background

Kidney transplant improves reproductive function in women with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Little is known about contraceptive use in women with history of kidney transplants.

Methods

Using the United States Renal Data System (2005-2014), we evaluated for each calendar year women with kidney transplantation who were aged 15-44 years with Medicare as the primary payer and linked data from the United Network for Organ Sharing, for up to three entire years after the date of transplantation. We determined rates of contraceptive use and used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with contraceptive use.

Results

The study cohort included 13,150 women and represented 26,624 person-years (PY). The rate of contraceptive use in women with kidney transplant was 9.5% of person-years. Figure 1 shows the rates of types of contraceptive use from 2005-2013. Compared to women aged 15–24 years, contraceptive use was lower in women aged 30–34 years (OR, 0.67; CI, 0.58-0.78), 35-39 years (OR, 0.36; CI, 0.31-0.43), and 40-44 years (OR, 0.23; CI, 0.19-0.28). Compared to white women, contraceptive use was higher in black women (OR, 1.26; CI, 1.10-1.43) and Native American women (OR, 1.52; CI, 1.02-2.26). Women had lower rates of contraceptive use in the second-year post-transplant (OR, 0.87; CI 0.79-0.94) and third-year post-transplant (OR, 0.69; CI 0.62-0.76) than in the first-year post-transplant. Women with a history of diabetes had a lower likelihood of contraceptive use (OR, 0.80; CI, 0.65-0.99).

Conclusion

Among women with kidney transplants, contraceptive use remains low at 9.5%. Factors associated with a higher likelihood of contraceptive use include younger age and black and Native American race/ethnicity; second- and third-year post-transplant and history of diabetes are associated with a lower likelihood of contraceptive use. The study highlights the importance of counseling for contraceptive use in women with kidney transplants.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support