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Abstract: PO1079

Physical Activity Levels in Hemodialysis Patients Measure Using a Commercially Available Activity Tracker

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Preciado, Priscila, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Han, Maggie, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Thwin, Ohnmar, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Tapia, Leticia, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Tao, Xia, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Hakim, Mohamad I., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Patel, Amrish U., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Rivera Fuentes, Lemuel, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Grobe, Nadja, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Raimann, Jochen G., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Thijssen, Stephan, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Kotanko, Peter, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
Background

Sedentary life is a major risk factor for all-cause mortality in the general population, more in those with cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Hemodialysis (HD) patients have an increased CV mortality and it has been shown that they are less active than their healthy piers.The use of physical activity (PA) tracking devices could provide an objective measurement of PA in HD patients’ everyday lives.We aimed to objectively quantify activity in a large HD population

Methods

This prospective, still ongoing study enrolled HD patients from 4 clinics in NYC beginning in May 2018 and followed them up to 1 year.Patients ≥18 years, HD ≥3 months, able to walk, owning a smartphone,mobile tablet or PC were enrolled.They were provided with a wrist-based tracking device (Fitbit® Charge 2).We present baseline characteristics and PA levels of the first 7 days of wear.Based on their average daily step counts,participants were separated into 3 categories:sedentary, fairly active, or active if they walked less than 5,000, 5,000 to 10,000, or >10,000 steps,respectively

Results

Fifty-six patients were included in this analysis (54±12 years,71% male, 60% black,28.6% had diabetes and 23.2% CHF, dialysis vintage 5.8±5.8 years and body mass index of 28.0±7.0 kg/m2).Participants walked an average of 6,470±4,617 steps per day, median of 5,513 [IQR 3,043-8,268] steps/day. Of the 56 participants,45%(n=25) were sedentary,39%(n=22) were fairly active,and 16% (n=9) were active (fig.1)

Conclusion

In our study, only a small number of patients exceeded the WHO recommendation of 10,000 steps/day.Overall, 83% of patients walked <10,000 steps/day.Further analysis is needed after completion of the study to assess the impact of a physical activity tracker device on physical activity levels.We hypothesized that the daily use of a tracker will positively impact activity levels and overall self-perceived health

Histogram average daily steps