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Abstract: PO0059

AKI in Hospitalized Patients with Influenza Is Associated with Worse Outcomes: A Study of National Inpatient Sample from 2012 to 2014 in the United States

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 102 AKI: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Elavia, Nasha, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Li, Si, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Yusuf, Ibitola, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Milekic, Bojana, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality every year. Physiologically, kidneys receive only 25% of the cardiac output in an average weight adult and therefore often develop acute kidney injury (AKI). Our study determines outcomes of AKI in adults hospitalized with influenza between 2012 and 2014 in the US.

Methods

We analyzed adult patients with a principal diagnosis of influenza from the 2012 to 2014 National Inpatient Sample. ICD-9-CM was used to identify the diagnosis variables. Patients were divided into two cohorts; with and without AKI. Patient characteristics between both groups were compared. Chi-squared analysis for categorical variables and multivariate regression analysis was done using STATA 16.0 to determine the relationship of outcomes. P <0.05 was used as the level of statistical significance.

Results

120,730 hospitalizations with influenza were sampled. 16,270 (13.5%) of these had AKI (image 1). After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with AKI had higher odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 3.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.00-4.89, p<0.001), developing severe sepsis (aOR 8.65; 95% CI 6.46-11.57), septic shock (aOR 9.53; 95% CI 6.42-14.16), rhabdomyolysis (aOR 3.03; 95% CI 2.39- 3.84), requiring intubation (aOR 5.57; 95% CI 4.61-6.74, p<0.001), a longer length of stay (1.8 day; 95% CI 1.52-2.08, p<0.001) and higher costs ($5054.4; 95% CI $3918.8-$6190.1, p<0.001).

Conclusion

Influenza complicated with AKI in hospitalized patients is associated with a worse outcome in terms of morbidity and mortality along with increased healthcare costs and a longer length of stay.

Characteristics of adult patients admitted with influenza