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Abstract: PO0433

Trends in the Transition to ESRD Among Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders Across the United States

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Rhee, Connie, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • You, Amy Seung, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Norris, Keith C., University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle Ritsuyo, University of Hawaii Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Davis, James, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Hayashida, Glen, National Kidney Foundation Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Page, Victoria, National Kidney Foundation Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Cheng, Shiuh-Feng, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Ng, Roland C.K., John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Wong, Linda L., John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
Background

Census data indicate there are >1.5 million Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHOPIs) in the US. While growing data show NHOPIs have a high prevalence of kidney disease risk factors (diabetes, obesity, hypertension, limited healthcare access), there are major knowledge gaps regarding the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in this population. We examined trends in the transition to ESRD in NHOPIs.

Methods

Using United States Renal Data System (USRDS) and Census Bureau data, we compared annual incident ESRD rates among NHOPI, African Americans (AA), and other racial subgroups over 2010-16. Rates were calculated as the observed incident ESRD count divided by the race-specific Census population size of that year. Multiple race designations were considered by utilizing Census categorizations that incorporated primary race in combination with one or more other races (alone or combination). We estimated crude rates and rates standardized to the age-sex distribution of 2011 race-specific Census population data.

Results

Over 2010-16, NHOPIs and AAs demonstrated the highest crude incident ESRD rates over time (Fig 1A). A similar pattern was observed for standardized incident ESRD rates (Fig 1B): 918, 638, 308, 226, and 162 incident ESRD patients per million (population)/year in 2016 for NHOPI, AA, Caucasian, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska Native subgroups, respectively. While standardized incident ESRD rates among AAs gradually declined, there was a steady rise in NHOPIs’ incident ESRD rates over time.

Conclusion

NHOPIs demonstrated the highest incident ESRD rates over time. Further studies are needed to determine sociodemographic, biologic/genetic, cultural, and health care related ESRD risk factors among NHOPIs to inform targeted interventions in this population.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support