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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1113

Self-Reported Sleep Patterns in a Prospective Hemodialysis Cohort

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Kalantar, Sara S., University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • You, Amy Seung, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Novoa, Alejandra, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Amel Peralta, Rene, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Nakata, Tracy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Rhee, Connie, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
Background

Growing evidence suggests that altered sleep patterns are prevalent in the general population, and are associated with worse health outcomes (obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease). However, there has been sparse examination of habitual sleep patterns in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, including those receiving dialysis. We thus examined self-reported sleep patterns in a well-defined prospective hemodialysis (HD) cohort.

Methods

Among 452 HD patients from the prospective Malnutrition, Diet, and Racial Disparities in Kidney Disease cohort recruited across 16 dialysis clinics, we administered protocolized sleep surveys during routine dialysis treatments over 10/2011-3/2015. Using self-reported questionnaires, patients were queried with respect to their habitual sleep patterns, including survey items related to 1) sleep duration, 2) sleep quality and disturbances, and 3) mental/emotional and physical symptoms potentially linked with sleep alterations.

Results

The mean±SD age of the study population was 55±14 years, among whom 54% were male, 28% were Black, 51% were Hispanic, and 55% had diabetes. In the overall cohort, the median (IQR) sleep duration was 6.0 (4.0, 8.0) and 7.0 (5.0, 8.0) hours on dialysis vs. non-dialysis days, respectively. Over two-thirds to three-quarters of the cohort reported sleeping during dialysis (76%), having difficulties sleeping at night (65%), and having insufficient sleep (72%); sleeping pill use was reported in 21% of patients. Half of the cohort reported stress/anxiety during dialysis, and 87% vs. 64% described feeling tired/exhausted on dialysis vs. non-dialysis days, respectively.

Conclusion

Our findings uncovered a high prevalence of altered sleep patterns in a well-defined prospective HD cohort. Further studies are needed to identify the modifiable and non-modifiable determinants of sleep alterations, as well as their downstream sequelae in dialysis patients.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support