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Abstract: PO0484

Pulse Mass Index and Pulse Mass Pressure Product in CKD Patients

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Oba, Rina, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Kanzaki, Go, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Haruhara, Kotaro, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Sasaki, Takaya, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Okabayashi, Yusuke, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Koike, Kentaro, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Tsuboi, Nobuo, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yokoo, Takashi, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Internal Medicine., 3-25-8 Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Background

Recent studies have conflicting findings on the association between obesity and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The body mass index (BMI) by itself is an imperfect marker of metabolically unhealthy obesity. The pulse mass index (PMI) and the pulse mass pressure product (PMPP) show strong correlations with the risk of cardiovascular disease and may reflect an individual's metabolic energy state. However, it is still unclear whether PMI and PMPP can be useful parameters for the risk of CKD.

Methods

We retrospectively identified 51 subjects who underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and kidney biopsy simultaneously at the Jikei University Hospital, Tokyo, from 2017 to 2019. All subjects were diagnosed as primary or secondary glomerular diseases by kidney biopsy. The PMI and the PMPP were calculated from the following formula: PMI = BMI × resting heart rate (RHR) /1730. PMPP = BMI × RHR × systolic blood pressure. We evaluated the clinicopathological findings associated with PMI and PMPP.

Results

Of 51 subjects, the age was 50.3 ± 16.1 years (mean ± standard deviation), and 60.8% were male. The eGFR was 44.4 ± 25.3 mL/min/1.73m2. The median glomerulosclerosis index (GS) was 18.3 (interquartile range, 4.7-44.4) %, and the tubular injury level was 17.5 (5.0-36.3) %. The PMI was 0.94 ± 0.23, the PMPP was 21.6 ± 7.3 ×104, and the BMI was 22.9 ± 4.47 kg/m2. Both PMI and PMPP were positively associated with GS, HbA1c, and triglyceride, whereas negatively associated with eGFR (P = 0.02 and 0.004; respectively), CKD stages (P = 0.04 and 0.02; respectively) and HDL. Of note, each parameter such as BMI, RHR, and blood pressure was not correlated with either eGFR or CKD stages.

Conclusion

We observed correlations between both PMI and PMPP and kidney function. This study indicates that PMI and PMPP may be possible makers of the relative risk of unhealthy obesity with CKD.