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Abstract: PO2020

Dietary Fat Intake and Mortality Across Kidney Function in a Nationally Representative Cohort

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Narasaki, Yoko, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • You, Amy Seung, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Miyagi, Tsuyoshi, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Miyasato, Yoshikazu, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Kimura, Hiroshi, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Sy, John, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Jin, Anna, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Kovesdy, Csaba P., The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Nguyen, Danh V., University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Rhee, Connie, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
Background

In the general population, lower dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are associated with greater survival. However, the optimal amount and type of dietary fat intake in patients with kidney disease is unknown. We assessed the relationship between dietary fat intake and mortality in a cohort of US adults with and without kidney disease.

Methods

We examined the association between dietary intake of fat subtypes (SFA, PUFA, monounsaturated fatty acids [MUFA]) ascertained by 24-hour dietary recall with mortality in continuous NHANES adult participants (1999-2014) stratified by absence vs. presence of kidney dysfunction (eGFRs ≥60 vs. <60ml/min/1.72m2, respectively). Dietary fat intake was estimated as a proportion (%) of total energy intake, and associations with all-cause mortality were estimated using adjusted Cox models.

Results

Among 37,155 participants who met eligibility criteria, 7% (N=2,677) had kidney dysfunction. In participants with normal kidney function, those with the highest tertile of SFA intake had higher death risk (ref: lowest tertile) (HRs [95%CI] 1.10 [1.01,1.19]), whereas those with the highest tertile of PUFA intake had better survival (HR [95%CI] 0.82 [0.76, 0.90]). In participants with kidney dysfunction, those in the second and third highest tertiles of SFA intake had significantly higher mortality risk and trended towards higher mortality, respectively: HRs (95%CIs) 1.21 (1.04, 1.41) and 1.13 (0.97, 1.32), respectively; however, PUFA was not associated with survival. In participants with and without kidney dysfunction, MUFA intake was not associated with mortality.

Conclusion

Higher dietary SFA intake was associated with a higher mortality in US adults with and without kidney dysfunction, whereas higher PUFA intake was associated with greater survival in those with preserved kidney function only. Further studies are needed to elucidate mechanisms behind the association of dietary fat intake with mortality.