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Abstract: PO1388

"I Hear and I Forget. I See and I Remember. I Do and I Understand." Incorporating Emergency Room-Based, High-Fidelity Medical Simulation into the Undergraduate Nephrology Course

Session Information

Category: Educational Research

  • 800 Educational Research

Authors

  • Pawlowicz, Ewa, Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
  • Kulesza, Michelle, Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
  • Szymanska, Aleksandra, Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
  • Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna, Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
  • Bartczak, Maria Katarzyna, Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
  • Nowicki, Michal P., Medical University of Lodz, Uniwersytet Medyczny w Lodzi, Lodz, Lodzkie, Poland
Background

Medical simulation develops clinical skills by implementing scenario in a true-to-life environment, but without exposing patient to any risk. There has been no information on use of high-fidelity simulation in undergraduate nephrology teaching. Scenarios are provided in Fig. 1. Aim of this study was to analyze students' opinions and reactions to the simulation module in nephrology.

Methods

The survey consisting of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience scale (SSES) and open-ended question concerning the overall impression of classes was conducted among 103 5-year medical students, who took part in the simulation training in nephrology. SSES consisted of three parts (debriefing, reasoning, education). Statements from the open-ended question were interpreted by means of the Atlas.ti software for qualitative data analysis.

Results

The overall score for simulation classes was 4.39±0.69 points. Students rated debriefing, reasoning and education at 4.43±0.78, 4.32±0.7 and 4.39±0.73 points, respectively. 87.4% and 84.5% of participants agreed that simulation developed their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills in nephrology, respectively.
Thematic analysis revealed that students evaluated the module as ’interesting’, ’useful' and 'informative’, but they found number of classes significantly insufficient. Students pointed out that due to the small emphasis placed on practical aspects in the existing curriculum e.g. routes of drug administration and conversion of doses, they could not fully benefit from simulation.

Conclusion

Medical simulation is a valuable constituent of the nephrology course. Putting greater emphasis on practical aspects from the beginning of training may enable students to benefit more from simulation modules.

Figure 1. Medical simulation scenarios conducted as a part of undergraduate nephrology course.