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Abstract: PO2018

Effect of High Fiber or Probiotics-Enriched Diets on Kidney Injury in Mice Model of Bilateral Ischemia Reperfusion

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Pourafshar, Shirin, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Poudel, Nabin, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Skrypnyk, Nataliya, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Yao, Junlan, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Okusa, Mark D., University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
Background

Changes in dietary intake have a significant effect on the incidence and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The progressive decline in kidney function during CKD can lead to increased systemic chronic inflammation and worsening of kidney injury. Fibers and probiotics are used by gastrointestinal bacteria to produce metabolites with anti-inflammatory activities. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of fiber and probiotics in ameliorating kidney injury using bilateral ischemia reperfusion (IR) surgery as a CKD model in mice.

Methods

Thirty-six C57BL/6J wild type, male mice were purchased from the Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA). After co-housing for a week, they were then isolated and randomly assigned to a diet: normal chow (C; control), high fiber (HF; modified AIN-93G with increased Hi-Maize Corn), and probiotics (P; AIN-93G with added Bifidobacteria spp.). After 14 days, mice underwent sham surgery (5 per group) or IR surgery (7 per group) and then resumed assigned diet for 28 days. Blood and fecal samples were collected both before surgery and after surgery. Mice were euthanized after 42 days to collect kidneys, small intestine, colon, fecal, and blood samples. Measurements of plasma creatinine, markers of kidney injury, and tissue staining were performed. Fecal samples were further processed to assess diversity of gut microbiota. Two-way ANOVA with Tukey’s multiple comparisons was used for statistical analysis.

Results

On each diet, the IR increased serum creatinine compared to sham (p<0.005), confirming kidney injury. Transcripts of kidney injury markers, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM1), were also higher with IR in all groups (p<0.05). However, NGAL and KIM1 were lower in HF and P compared to C, respectively (p<0.005). The histology sections in control group appeared to be more fibrotic compared to the other two groups. The sequencing of 16s rRNA gene was completed and is currently being used to assess the composition and diversity of gut microbiota in each group.

Conclusion

Supplementation with fiber or probiotics may reduce kidney injury after ischemia. Additional studies to identify specific changes in metabolites driving this protection are needed.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support