ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2436

The First Increase in Live Kidney Donation in the United States in 15 Years

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Al Ammary, Fawaz, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Massie, Allan, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Crews, Deidra C., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Segev, Dorry L., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Muzaale, Abimereki, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Background

After more than a decade of decline, the first sustained increase in live kidney donation was observed in the US from 2017 to 2019. Understanding these trends in donation may provide opportunities to effectively sustain or even enhance this recent increase in donors.

Methods

We conducted a national registry study of 35,900 donors (70.3% white, 14.5% Hispanic, 9.3% black, 4.4% Asian) to understand the increase in 2017-2019 vs. 2014-2016 using Poisson regression stratified by donor–recipient relationship (biologically related, unrelated, and kidney paired donors).

Results

Among biologically related donors aged <35, 35-49, and ≥50 years, the number of donors did not change across race/ethnicity but increased by 38% and 29% for Hispanic and black ≥50. Among unrelated donors <35, 35-49, and ≥50, white donors increased by 18%, 14%, and 27%; Hispanic donors <35 did not change but increased by 22% and 35% for 35-49 and ≥50; black donors <35 declined by 23% and did not change for 35-49 and ≥50; Asian donors did not change. Among kidney paired donors <35, 35-49, and ≥50, white donors increased by 42%, 50%, and 68%; Hispanic donors <35 and 35-49 increased by 36% and 55% and did not change for ≥50; black donors did not change; Asian donors <35 did not change but increased by 107% and 82% for 35-49 and ≥50.

Conclusion

The increase in live kidney donation was driven predominantly by unrelated and paired white donors. Donation among unrelated black individuals should be promoted.

Annual number of live kidney donors in the US from 2014 to 2019, stratified by donor type

Funding

  • NIDDK Support