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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1384

A Kidney Education Program Integrated into Middle School Science Classes Increases Student Kidney Knowledge, Improves Health Behaviors, and Increases Kidney Health Literacy

Session Information

Category: Educational Research

  • 800 Educational Research

Authors

  • Wright Nunes, Julie A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Rao, Panduranga S., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Ransier, Ben, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • DuRussel-Weston, Jean, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Newman, Brad, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Ma, Julie, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Resnicow, Kenneth A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Eagle, Kim, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
Background

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious and growing public health problem. Literature shows primary disease prevention is successful when incorporated early in life. There are few reports about CKD prevention efforts in youth.

Methods

A 3-lesson kidney program was designed by health and wellness staff, school teachers and researchers, and aligned with U.S. school science standards. It was integrated into two middle school science classes, located in high-risk areas of renal failure. The 3-lesson program covered kidney physiology, epidemiology and environmental and genetic risk factors. Students were tested before and after the kidney program. We used linear regression to examine bivariate and multivariate associations between demographics and test responses comparing pre- and post-tests.

Results

Two-hundred and nine 6th and 7th grade students received the 3-lesson kidney program. One-hundred and eighteen (57%) were male, 44 (23%) non-Hispanic Caucasian, 26 (12%) non-Hispanic African American, 26 (12%) other races, and 98 (48%) were Hispanic. Post-tests increased significantly for health literacy (from mean SD 3.1 (0.05) to 3.4 (0.05) p=0.02), kidney general knowledge (2.3 (1.1) to 3.9 (1.6) p<0.01), kidney physiology (3.9 (1.1) to 4.6 (1.0) p<0.01) and student ratings of kidney importance (4.0 (0.9) to 4.3 (0.7) p<0.01). Students also reported increases in daily activity and reduced consumption of fruit juices. In analyses adjusted for school, race, gender, ethnicity and age, health literacy, kidney general knowledge, kidney physiology, kidney importance and behaviors remained significantly improved.

Conclusion

A 3-lesson kidney program seamlessly delivered by teachers during science classes at two middle schools in high-risk areas for renal failure improved student health literacy, knowledge and behaviors. Next steps will be to examine impact in larger cohorts and clinical indices over time.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support