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Abstract: PO1146

Roxadustat in Treating Anemia in Dialysis Patients (ROAD): Short-Term Impact on Serum Iron Markers

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Hong, Daqing, Department of Nephrology, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • Zheng, Guangyi, Department of Nephrology, Ya'an People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • Zou, Yang, Department of Nephrology, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • Cai, Yanrong, Gao Xin Boli Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • He, Jingdong, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, China
  • Xue, Hen, Department of Nephrology, Ya'an People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • He, Qiang, Department of Nephrology, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
  • Li, Guisen, Department of Nephrology, Sichuan Academy of Medical Sciences & Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital, Chengdu, China
Background

This analysis is to provide clinical data of Roxadustat on iron markers in a real-world prospective observational cohort.

Methods

This is a multicenter, prospective, longitudinal observational cohort study assessing if Roxadustat improves prognosis in at least 250 dialysis patients with renal anemia. Primary outcomes will be major cardiovascular events. The current analysis was done in the enrolled 144 patients to compare the changes of iron markers from baseline to present.

Results

Till May 20, 2020. 144 dialysis participants (76 male, mean age 52+/-15 years) were enrolled from 11 sites of the study with a follow up of 8 (0~12) weeks. Hemoglobin increased by 8.5g/L (95%CI:6.1 to 10.8 g/L, p<0.001) significantly from baseline to last follow up. The serum ferritin at baseline and at the last follow up was 639.13+/-530.18 pg/ml and 473.52+/-520.34 pg/ml respectively (p<0.001). TSAT remained stable from baseline to last follow up (36.8+/-20.5% vs. 36.7+/-22.7%, p=0.93). In patients with ferritin greater than 500 pg/ml or 800 pg/ml, changes of ferritin were 245 pg/ml (95%CI:117.62 to 373.46, p<0.001) and 362.01 pg/ml (95%CI: 99.34 to 580.30, p=0.008). In patients with low responsiveness to ESA, according to ESA dosage (greater than 300U/Kg/Week, 199.41pg/ml, 95%CI: 37.69 to 361.12, p=0.019) or by investigators' judgement (143.83pg/ml, 95%CI:55.99 to 231.67 pg/ml, p=0.002), the results were similar and significant. TSAT did not change significantly among the whole cohort and in the subgroup analysis.

Conclusion

Roxadustat could increase hemoglobin in dialysis patients in ROAD cohort. It could decrease serum ferritin in dialysis patients, regardless of the high ferritin or responsiveness of ESA treatment and maintains stable TSAT. These might indicate that Roxadustat partially increase hemoglobin by alter iron status even in patients have low responsiveness to ESA treatment.

Figure 1 Ferritin changes from ROAD cohort.
A. patients with hyperresponsiveness to ESA
B. patients with baseline ferritin greater than 500 pg/ml.