ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0889

Malnutrition During Pregnancy Impairs Nephrogenesis by Interrupting Methionine Metabolism

Session Information

Category: Development, Stem Cells, and Regenerative Medicine

  • 500 Development, Stem Cells, and Regenerative Medicine

Authors

  • Volovelsky, Oded, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Makayes, Yaniv, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Resnick, Elad, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Kopan, Raphael, Division of Developmental Biology, Cincinati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • Nechama, Morris, Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
Background

Poor nutritional status during pregnancy has long term effects on kidney health by impairing nephron endowment in an unknown mechanism. Nephron progenitor cells are dependent on constant nutrient supply for maintaining high metabolic activity. We aimed to study the effect of malnutrition during pregnancy on the metabolic profile of nephron progenitor cells.

Methods

Six2 Cretg/+ males were mated with wild type females. Pregnant mice were fed with 70% of the daily chaw intake in individual cages. Six2+ NPC's cells were FACS sorted and the metabolites were extracted and measured using mass spectrometry. For kidney organ cultures, kidneys were dissected and immediately incubated in well plates containing media either with or without L-methionine. By the end of the incubation period, the kidneys were fixed and whole-mount immunostained for Six2 and cytokeratin (ureteric bud marker). The nephron number was measured by acid maceration.

Results

The metabolomic analysis showed significant impairment in methionine metabolism in E15.5 NPCs. Methionine deprivation in organ culture reduced nephron progenitors' density in metanephric mesenchyme of cultured embryonic kidneys. The effect was reversible by supplementation of the media without L-methionine, with metabolites that promote methionine recycling. Supplementation of methionine-enriched drinking water to caloric restricted pregnant mice prevented the reduction in nephron number in offspring.

Conclusion

Impairment of methionine metabolism plays a major role in mediating the effect of caloric restriction on kidney development. Replenishing methionine may revert the effect of malnutrition on the future risk of developing chronic kidney disease in offspring.