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Abstract: PO0869

Electrolyte Abnormalities in Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19

Session Information

Category: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Liu, Diane, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Fisher, Molly, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Basalely, Abby Miriam, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Kumar, Neelja D., Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Thakkar, Jyotsana, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Golestaneh, Ladan, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Reidy, Kimberly J., Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Chen, Wei, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
Background

Electrolyte abnormalities have been observed in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Whether the prevalence of electrolyte disturbances differ between hospitalized patients with and without COVID-19 is unknown.

Methods

We performed a retrospective observational study of adult patients hospitalized in a large tertiary healthcare system in the Bronx between March 11-April 26, 2020. We compared the prevalence of the disturbances in sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium between patients with and without COVID-19 using Chi-square. Electrolyte disturbances were defined as the following: hypernatremia (>145 mEq/L), hyponatremia (<135 mEq/L), hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), hypokalemia (<3.5 mmol/L), hypermagnesemia (>2.5 mEq/L), hypomagnesemia (<1.5 mEq/L), hypocalcemia (<8.5 mg/dL) and hypoalbuminemia (<3.5 g/dL).

Results

Of 4579 patients, 51.8% were male. Median age was 65 years, IQR (52-76). 3313 (72.3%) were positive for the COVID-19. Hypernatremia, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypermagnesemia, hypocalcemia, and hypoalbuminemia were significantly more common in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (p<0.0001).

Conclusion

Dysnatremias, hyperkalemia, and hypermagnesemia were more common in patients with COVID-19. Hypocalcemia was more common in patients with COVID-19 but this may be due to a higher prevalence of hypoalbuminemia. Further studies are needed looking at adjusted models to describe the association between electrolyte abnormalities and clinical outcomes.

Figure 1. Prevalence of Electrolyte Abnormalities in Patients with and without COVID-19

Funding

  • NIDDK Support