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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2439

Assessment of Kidney Function at 3 and 6 Months in Kidney Donors with Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Lima lucero, Jesus Daniel, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Valdez-Ortiz, Rafael, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Perez-Navarro, L. Monserrat, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Ortega, Ana Gabriela, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de Mexico, DF, Mexico
  • Lopez, Ernesto Chavez, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
Background

Cardio-metabolic risk factors (CRFs) in kidney donors contribute to further deterioration of kidney function after donation, increase their post-donation cardiovascular risk. Objective: To assess the renal function of kidney donors with CRFs at 3 and 6 months after donation.

Methods

Cross-sectional, descriptive study, which included kidney donors who were admitted to the National Medical Center "Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret" during the period from 2015 to 2019. Descriptive statistics were made, ANOVA with a 95% CI and a value of p <0.05. The CRFs dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia, body mass index (BMI) and hyperuricemia were evaluated.

Results

153 donors were admitted, 34% without social security, 59% women, with a mean age of 42.7 ± 10.7 years. The clinical and biochemical characteristics at hospital admission were: mean SBP / DBP was 106 ± 6.02 /72.9=5.4, BMI, 26.3 ± 3.2, proteinuria 126.4 ± 13.4, hematocrit 44.6 ± 4.9, albumin 4.1 ± 0.4, K 4.1 ± 0.4, Ca 9.2 ± 0.6, Uric acid 5.4 ± 1.2, Total cholesterol 185.6 ± 34.4, triglycerides 156.5 ± 91.7, fasting glucose 91.6 ± 15.2, Creatinine 0.78 ± 0.14. The mean bleeding during surgery was 263.66 ± 447 ml, creatinine after surgery was 1.21 ± 1.8, upon release from hospital it was 1.13 ± 0.27. 72% of donors presented acute kidney injury (AKI) after surgery, with an average of 1.56 ± 1.8 days with AKI, 56% of donors released from hospital with AKI. More than 25% of kidney donors had 2, 3 and 4 CRFs. Figure 1 presents the comparison between groups (AKI vs No AKI) of creatinines at baseline, 3 months and 6 months.

Conclusion

A higher presence of CRFs is associated with higher AKI events after kidney donation. AKI patients during renal donation show a further deterioration of renal function at 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Timely interventions prior to donation could improve the evolution of this group of patients.