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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2498

Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Kidney Donors at a Third-Level Hospital of Care in Mexico

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Lima lucero, Jesus Daniel, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Ortega, Ana Gabriela, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Ciudad de Mexico, DF, Mexico
  • Valdez-Ortiz, Rafael, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Perez-Navarro, L. Monserrat, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
  • Lopez, Ernesto Chavez, Hospital General de Mexico Dr Eduardo Liceaga, Ciudad de Mexico, Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico
Background

Living donor kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for chronic terminal kidney disease. A high prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors (CRFs) in the general population implies challenges when choosing the best candidate for kidney donation. Knowing the frequency of CRFs will allow us to make timely interventions in order to reduce cardiovascular complications after donation.

Methods

Cross-sectional, descriptive study, which included kidney donors who were admitted to the National Medical Center “Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret” during the period from 2015 to 2019. Descriptive statistics were made, with a 95% IC. CRFs were included; systolic hypertension (SBP) higher than 120mmhg, diastolic hypertension (DBP) higher than 80mmhg, anemia hemoglobin less than 13 g/dl in men and less than 12 g/dl in women; impaired fasting glucose> 110 mg / dl, body mass index (BMI)> 25.

Results

153 donors were included, 59% were women, 33% were siblings and 31% were the patient's mother; 34% had no social security. The mean age was 42.7 ± 10.7 years; the mean BMI 26.3 ± 5.4, with a mean GFR 101.9 ± 13.4 (61.6 -133) ml / min. 28% of donors smoked, 7% had SBP risk and 27% DBP risk, 60% had BMI> 25, 4% had anemia and 13% hypoalbuminemia; 10% with impaired fasting glucose. Figure 1 shows the prevalence of CRF. More than 25% of kidney donors had 2, 3 and 4 CRFs on admission to hospital for donation. 72% presented acute kidney injury (AKI) after surgery, none required renal replacement therapy. The highest AKI frequency was observed in subjects who had from 1 to 3 CRFs with frequencies of 26-34%.

Conclusion

A BMI higher than 25 was the most prevalent CRFs; associated with AKI when more than 1 CRF was observed. Timely detection of CRFs will allow for timely interventions that will reduce post-donation cardiovascular risk and decrease the risk of AKI.