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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2415

Self-Reported Walk Pace and Cardiovascular Events in Adults with CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Bruinius, Jacob, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Hannan, Mary, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • He, Jiang, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Brown, Julia, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Kansal, Mayank, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Saunders, Milda Renne, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Chen, Jinsong, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Ricardo, Ana C., University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Lash, James P., University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Background

Physical function, as measured by self-reported walk pace, is lower in patients with CKD compared to the general population. While slower walk pace has been found to be associated with cardiovascular outcomes in non-CKD populations, its relationship to cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients has not been fully explored.

Methods

We used data from 3925 adults with mild-to-moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Walk pace (scored 0-4) was self-reported using the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Typical Week Physical Activity Survey. Outcomes included atherosclerotic events (a composite of myocardial infarction, stroke or peripheral arterial disease), incident heart failure, all-cause death, and cardiovascular death. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models with time-updated covariates were used to evaluate the association of walk pace with outcomes.

Results

At baseline, mean age was 58 years, 45% were women, 33% had self-reported cardiovascular disease, mean eGFR was 45 ml/min/m2, 12% reported brisk or striding walk pace (>3 mph), 39% reported average walk pace (2-3 mph), and 48% reported walk pace of none or casual (<2 mph). During a median follow-up of 11.5 years, there were 725 atherosclerotic events, 790 incident heart failure events, 1333 deaths from any cause, and 434 cardiovascular deaths. In fully adjusted models, there was a graded association between walk pace and risk for each outcome (Figure).

Conclusion

In this cohort of adults with CKD, faster self-reported walk pace was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. These findings may have implications for risk stratification, as well as for future interventions targeting physical function in patients with CKD.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support